ABDR 1301 W – Auto Body Repair & Repaint (3,1,4).

An introduction to the use of hand and power tools, techniques of metalworking, body preparation, plastic fillers, fiberglass and SMC repair, sanding, and application of primers with emphasis on shop safety practices.

ABDR 1431 W – Basic Refinishing (4,2,7).

An introduction to current refinishing products, shop safety, and equipment used in the automotive refinishing industry. Emphasis on surface preparation, masking techniques, and refinishing of replacement parts.

ABDR 2359 W – Structural Sectioning (3,1,6).

Skill development in the practical application of welded panel replacement and structural sectioning procedures as well as practical equipment applications in structural vehicle straightening, alignment, welding, and corrosion protection.

ACCT 2301 A – Principals of Financial Accounting (3,3,0).

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting as prescribed by U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as applied to transactions and events that affect business organizations. Students will examine the procedures and systems to accumulate, analyze, measure, and record financial transactions. Students will use recorded financial information to prepare a balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, and statement of shareholders’ equity to communicate the business entity’s results of operations and financial position to users of financial information who are external to the company. Students will study the nature of assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity while learning to use reported financial information for purposes of making decisions about the company. Students will be exposed to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

ACCT 2302 A – Principals of Managerial Accounting (3,3,0).

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting appropriate for all organizations. Students will study information from the entity’s accounting system relevant to decisions made by internal managers, as distinguished from information relevant to users who are external to the company. The emphasis is on the identification and assignment of product costs, operational budgeting and planning, cost control, and management decision making. Topics include product costing methodologies, cost behavior, operational and capital budgeting, and performance evaluation. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301.

ARTV 2341 W – Advanced Digital Video (3,3,0).

Advanced digital video techniques for post-production. Emphasizes integration of special effects and animation for film, video, and the Internet. Exploration of new and emerging compression and video streaming technologies.

AUMT 1257 W – Automotive Brake Systems Theory (2,1,2).

Theory and principles related to the design, operation, and servicing of automotive braking systems. Includes disc and drum-type brakes, hydraulic systems, power assist components, anti-lock brake systems, and diagnosis and reconditioning procedures.

AUMT 1307 W – Automotive Electrical Systems (3,2,4).

An overview of automotive electrical systems including topics in operational theory, testing, diagnosis, and repair of, charging and starting systems, and electrical accessories. Emphasis on electrical principles, schematic diagrams, and service manuals. May be taught manufacturer specific.

AGEQ 1411 W – Equine Science (4,2,2).

An introduction to the horse industry. Includes history, organization and operation of equine enterprises, selection, breeds, breeding, reproduction, health, nutrition, management, and marketing.

ARTS 1301 A – Art Appreciation (3,3,0).

This is a course on the appreciation of art. The content is based on looking at works of art. The objective of this is to broaden and enlighten the cultural background of the student. Art Appreciation is required for all art majors. Elementary Education and various other degree majors should consult the catalog of the four-year institution to which you intend to transfer.

ARTS 1311 A – Design I (3,3,3).

Emphasis upon two-dimensional design; includes the fundamentals of line, color, form, texture, shape, space and arrangement. A foundation course structured to solving compositional problems through various mediums such as drawing and painting.

ARTS 1312 A – Design II (3,3,3).

A continuation of ARTS 1311 with emphasis on three dimensional design. Solving of compositional problems. Study of the interrelationship between sculpture, drawing, printmaking, and painting. Prerequisite: ARTS 1311 A -.

ARTS 1316 A – Drawing I (3,3,3).

A fundamental course investigating a variety of media, techniques and subjects, exploring perceptual and descriptive possibilities. Emphasis is placed on visual perceptions and final works ready for exhibit.

ARTS 1317 A – Drawing II (3,3,3).

Expansion of Drawing I stressing the expression and conceptual aspects of drawing to solve total compositional problems with various drawing mediums. Prerequisite: ARTS 1316.

ARTS 2316 A – Painting I (3,3,3).

A disciplined study of the use of oil, color mixing, methods of application on canvas and panels using genre, portraits, still life, and landscape subjects. Exploring the potentials of painting media with emphasis on color and composition.

ARTV 1351 W – Digital Video (3,2,3).

Producing and editing video and sound for multimedia or web productions. Emphasizes capture, editing, and outputting of video using a digital video workstation.

AUMT 1310 W – Automotive Brake Systems (3,2,4).

Operation and repair of drum/disc type brake systems. Topics include brake theory, diagnosis, and repair of power, manual, anti-lock brake systems, and parking brakes. May be taught with manufacturer specific instructions.

AUMT 1405 W – Introduction to Automotive Technology (4,2,6).

An introduction to the automotive industry including automotive history, safety practices, shop equipment and tools, vehicle subsystems, service publications, professional responsibilities, and basic automotive maintenance. May be taught manufacturer specific.

AUMT 2301 W – Automotive Management (3,2,2).

Study of human and customer relations, and customer satisfaction in the automotive service industry. Emphasis on management and building relationships between the service department and the customer.

BCIS 1305 A – Business Computer Applications (3,2,4).

Computer terminology, hardware, software, operating systems, and information systems relating to the business environment. The main focus of this course is on business applications of software, including word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation graphics, and business-oriented utilization of the Internet. When taking online: Must have a computer with Windows OS. Tests will be administered in the TC Testing Center (Unless administered by a pre-approved proctor outside of the Texarkana area).

BIOL 1306 A – Biology for Science Majors I (lecture) (3,3,0).

An integrated approach to cell and molecular biology with emphasis on biological chemistry, cell structure and function, genetics and evolutionary theory. Recommended co-requisite: BIOL 1106. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

BIOL 1307 A – Biology for Science Majors II (lecture) (3,3,0).

Continuation of BIOL 1306. An integrated study of structure and function in biological populations. Includes organismal diversity and physiological aspects of transport, nutrition, gas exchange, communication, reproduction and development. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306 Recommended co-requisite BIOL 1107.

BIOL 1308 A – Biology for Non-Science Majors I (lecture) (3,3,0).

The process and method of science applied to understanding biological concepts at the molecular, cellular, organismal and community levels. Survey of major groups of organisms with respect to their diversity in organization, processes, interactions, and adaptations including human impact upon the environment. The scientific method and social applications of scientific information to related human issues are stressed throughout the course. Recommended co-requisite: BIOL 1108.

BIOL 1309 A – Biology for Non-Science Majors II (lecture) (3,3,0).

The process and methods of science applied to understanding biological concepts at the molecular, cellular, organismal and community levels. Human systems, nutrition, development, homeostasis, genetics, evolutionary principles and ecology will be stressed with application to contemporary issues in human health and the environment. Recommended co-requisite: BIOL 1109

BIOL 1322 A – Nutrition and Diet Therapy I (3,3,0).

A detailed study of the science of food and its effect on human biology. The course is structured around the six major nutrient classes–carbohydrates, lipids, protein, vitamins, minerals, water. The action and interaction of these substances are explored in relation to health and disease. In addition, students examine the processing of these nutrients by the body including digestion, absorption, metabolic pathways, and excretion. Menu planning is also discussed as is weight control and fitness.

BIOL 2289 A – Academic Cooperative Field Study in Biology (2,0,7).

A course designed to integrate campus study with applied experience in the laboratory and/or field study. Specific objectives will be formulated and learning experiences directed toward fulfilling those objectives. The use of accepted methodologies in collecting specimen, materials, and/or data and the systematic use of instruments and equipment in classification, by testing, and analysis.

BIOL 2301 A – Anatomy & Physiology I (lecture) (3,3,0).

study of the gross and microscopic anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, integument, muscular-skeletal, and nervous systems. Prior completion of CHEM 1305 is strongly recommended. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test. Recommended co-requisite BIOL 2101 A -.

BIOL 2302 A – Anatomy & Physiology II (lecture) (3,3,0).

continuation of BIOL 2301. Includes the gross and microscopic anatomy and physiology of the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine and reproductive systems, immunity and fluid-electrolyte/acid base balance. Prerequisite: BIOL 2301 and successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test or permission of the instructor. Recommended co-requisite BIOL 2102 A -.

BIOL 2306 A – Environmental Biology (lecture) (3,3,0).

An interdisciplinary introduction to basic principles of environmental science with emphasis on the relationship of humans and their environment. Topics covered include basic ecological concepts, human population dynamics, climate, global warming, ozone depletion, hazardous waste, food, land, air, and water resources, biodiversity, and achieving a sustainable earth society. Recommended co-requisite: BIOL 2106

BIOL 2389 A – Academic Cooperative Field Study in Biology (3,0,9).

A course designed to integrate campus study with applied experience in the laboratory and/or field study. Specific objectives will be formulated and learning experiences directed toward fulfilling those objectives. The use of accepted methodologies in collecting specimen, materials, and/or data and the systematic use of instruments and equipment in classification, by testing, and analysis.

BUSI 1301 A – Business Principles (3,3,0).

This course provides a survey of economic systems, forms of business ownership, and considerations for running a business. Students will learn various aspects of business, management, and leadership functions; organizational considerations; and decision-making processes. Financial topics are introduced, including accounting, money and banking, and securities markets. Also included are discussions of business challenges in the legal and regulatory environment, business ethics, social responsibility, and international business. Emphasized is the dynamic role of business in everyday life.

BUSI 2301 A – Business Law (3,3,0).

The course provides the student with foundational information about the U.S. legal system and dispute resolution, and their impact on business. The major content areas will include general principles of law, the relationship of business and the U.S. Constitution, state and federal legal systems, the relationship between law and ethics, contracts, sales, torts, agency law, intellectual property, and business law in the global context.

CDEC 1317 W – Child Development Associate Training I (3,2,2).

Based on the requirements for the Child Development Associate National Credential (CDA). Topics include CDA overview, observation skills, and child growth and development. The four functional areas of study are creative, cognitive, physical, and communication.

CDEC 1319 W – Child Guidance (3,2,2).

An exploration of guidance strategies for promoting prosocial behaviors with individual and groups of children. Emphasis on positive guidance principles and techniques, family involvement, and cultural influences.

CDEC 1359 W – Children with Special Needs (3,3,0).

A survey of information regarding children with special needs including possible causes and characteristics of exceptionalities, intervention strategies, available resources, referral processes, the advocacy for children with special needs and their families. The student will use various types of materials and resources, including current technology, to support learning in all domains for all children.

CDEC 2326 W – Administration of Programs for Children I (3,3,0).

A practical application of management procedures for early care and education programs, including a study of operating, supervising, and evaluating programs. Topics on philosophy, types of programs, policies, fiscal management, regulations, staffing, evaluation, and communication. Prerequisite: Six hours of child development course work or advisor approval.

CETT 1329 W – Solid State Devices (3,2,4).

A study of diodes, transistor characteristics and other semiconductor devices, including analysis of static and dynamic characteristics, biasing techniques, and thermal considerations.

CETT 1405 W – AC Circuits (4,3,3).

A study of the fundamentals of alternating current, including series and parallel AC circuits, phasors, capacitive and inductive networks, transformers, and resonance.

CETT 1409 W – DC-AC Circuits (2,4,4).

Fundamentals of DC circuits and AC circuits operation including Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s laws, networks, transformers, resonance, phasors, capacitive and inductive and circuit analysis techniques.

CHEF 1305 W – Sanitation and Safety (3,2,4).

A study of personal cleanliness; sanitary practices in food preparation; causes, investigation, control of illness caused by food contamination (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points); and work place safety standards.

CHEF 1341 W – American Regional Cuisine (3,2,4).

A study of the development of regional cuisine’s in the United States with emphasis on the similarities in production and service systems. Application of skills to develop, organize, and acquire knowledge of recipe strategies and production systems.

CHEF 1345 W – International Cuisine (3,1,6).

The study of classical cooking skills associated with the preparation and service of international and ethnic cuisines. Topics include similarities between food production systems used in the United States and other regions of the world.

CHEF 1480 W – Cooperative Education: Culinary Arts/ Chef Training (4,1,21).

Career-related activities encountered in the student’s area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component.

CHEM 1305 A – Introductory Chemistry I (lecture) (3,3,0).

survey of chemistry including the metric system, scientific method, physical properties of matter, atomic structure, ionic and covalent bonding, naming of compounds, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, liquids, solids, solutions, equilibrium, acid-based theory, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and a brief survey of functional groups of organic molecules and biomolecules. Recommended co-requisite: CHEM 1105 A –

CHEM 1307 A – Introductory Chemistry II (lecture) (3,3,0).

A survey of organic and biochemistry including functional groups, nomenclature, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, bioenergetics, catabolism, anabolism, nucleic acids, nutrition, digestion, body fluids, neurotransmitters, hormones, immunoglobulins and current topics.

CHEM 1311 A – General Chemistry I (lecture) (3,3,0).

Fundamental principles of theoretical and applied chemistry, stoichiometry, atomic structure, periodic arrangement of elements, ionic and covalent bonding, gases, liquids, and solids. Prerequisite: College Algebra (MATH 1314) or equivalent academic preparation. Recommended co-requisite: CHEM 1111

CHEM 1312 A – General Chemistry II (lecture) (3,3,0).

Fundamental principles of theoretical and applied chemistry. Topics of study include acid-based theory, kinetics, equilibrium, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, qualitative analysis, and introduction to organic and biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 1311 or the permission of the instructor. Recommended co-requisite: CHEM 1112

CHEM 2325 A – Organic Chemistry II (lecture) (3,3,0).

The classification, structure, nomenclature, methods of preparation, and standard reactions of carboxylic acids, sulfonic acids, amines, diazonium salts, aldehydes, ketones, carbohydrates, proteins, polyhydroxy compounds, heterocyclic compounds, and their derivatives. Prerequisite: CHEM 2323. Recommended co-requisite: CHEM 2125.

CHEM 2289 A – Academic Cooperative Field Study in Chemistry (2,0,7).

A course designed to integrate campus study with applied experience in the laboratory and/or field study. Specific objectives will be formulated and learning experiences and activities will be directed toward fulfilling those objectives. The use of accepted methodologies in collecting field materials and systematic use of appropriate instruments in their analysis is central to the purpose of the course.

COMM 1307 A – Introduction to Mass Communications (3,3,0).

This course is a lecture class on the history of the world’s communications, beginning with cavemen drawings on cave walls and continuing through the invention of the Internet. Also covered are the histories of newspapers, magazines, recordings, radio, television, movies, and the Internet. Students are not members of the TC News staff.

COMM 1316 A – News Photography I (3,2,3).

An introductory course in problems and practices of photography for newspapers. The course teaches use of digital cameras, accessories and photographic techniques used by photojournalists. Students must provide their own digital camera and photo-printing paper. Students serve as photographers for the TC News. Prerequisite: COMM 2311 or concurrent enrollment in COMM 2311 or consent of instructor.

COMM 2305 A – Editing and Layout (3,2,3).

Included in this course, via both lecture and actual practice, are the basics of copy editing for accuracy and fairness. Also included are the basics of page design and construction. Students will serve as members of the TC News page-building crew. Prerequisite: COMM 2311 or consent of instructor.

COMM 2311 A – Media Writing (3,2,3).

This entry-level journalism course is a study of gathering, processing, and delivery content. The whole range of the reporter’s work is covered by lecture and actual practice with the students working as reporters for the TC News. Proper media writing and media styles are stressed. This course is a prerequisite for COMM 1316, 2305, 2315.

COMM 2315 A – News Reporting (3,3,0).

This course is a continuation of COMM 2311, includes a comprehensive study of interviewing, writing and reporting. Emphasis is on more complex stories and more specialized types of reporting and writing. Prerequisite: COMM 2311 A.

COMM 2366 A – Introduction to Film (3,2,4).

Emphasis on the analysis of the visual and aural aspects of selected motion pictures, dramatic aspects of narrative films, and historical growth and sociological effect of film as an art. Cross-listed as DRAM 2366.

COSC 1336 A – Programming Fundamentals I (3,3,3).

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of structured programming and provides a comprehensive introduction to programming for computer science and technology majors. Topics include software development methodology, data types, control structures, functions, arrays, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging. This course assumes computer literacy.

COSC 1337 A – Programming Fundamentals II (3,2,4).

This course focuses on the object-oriented programming paradigm, emphasizing the definition and use of classes along with fundamentals of object-oriented design. The course includes basic analysis of algorithms, searching and sorting techniques, and an introduction to software engineering processes. Students will apply techniques for testing and debugging software. (This course is included in the Field of Study Curriculum for Computer Science.) Prerequisite: COSC 1336 Programming Fundamentals I.

COSC 2336 A – Programming Fundamentals III (3,3,3).

Further applications of programming techniques, introducing the fundamental concepts of data structures and algorithms. Topics include data structures (including stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, trees, and graphs), searching, sorting, recursion, and algorithmic analysis. Programs will be implemented in an appropriate object oriented language. Prerequisite: COSC 1337 Programming Fundamentals II.

CRIJ 1307 A – Crime in America (3,3,0).

American crime problems in historical perspective, social and public policy factors affecting crime, impact and crime trends, social characteristics of specific crimes, and prevention of crime.

CRIJ 1310 A – Fundamentals of Criminal Law (3,3,0).

This course is the study of criminal law including application of definitions, statutory elements, defenses and penalties using Texas statutes, the Model Penal Code, and case law. The course also analyzes the philosophical and historical development of criminal law and criminal culpability.

CRIJ 1313 A – Juvenile Justice System (3,3,0).

A study of the juvenile justice process to include specialized juvenile law, role of the juvenile law, role of the juvenile courts, role of police agencies, role of correctional agencies, and theories concerning delinquency.

CRIJ 2313 A – Correctional Systems and Practices (3,3,0).

This course is a survey of institutional and non-institutional corrections. Emphasis will be placed on the organization and operation of correctional systems; treatment and rehabilitation; populations served; Constitutional issues; and current and future issues.

CRIJ 2328 A – Police Systems and Practices (3,3,0).

This course examines the establishment, role and function of police in a democratic society. It will focus on types of police agencies and their organizational structure, police-community interaction, police ethics, and use of authority.

CSME 2445 W – Instructional Theory and Clinic Operation (4,2,8).

An overview of the objectives required by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation Instructor Examination. Instructors-in-training will demonstrate the skills required for the completion of the state licensing agency’s curriculum including the management of a lab/clinic in a cosmetology program and classroom management skills. TSI Reading

CSME 2544 W – Cosmetology Instructor IV (5,3,8).

Advanced concepts of instruction in a cosmetology program. Topics include demonstration, development, and implementation of advanced evaluation and assessment techniques. Instructors-in-training will practice instructional skills, develop assessment and evaluation techniques that promote student learning, and implement evaluation tools to measure student outcomes. TSI Reading

DAAC 1304 W – Pharmacology of Addiction (3,3,0).

Psychological, physiological, and sociological effects of mood altering substances and behaviors and their implications for the addiction process are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the pharmacological effects of tolerance, dependency/withdrawal, cross addiction, and drug interaction.

DAAC 2466 Practicum (or Field Experience) – Alcohol/Drug Abuse Counseling (4,0,28 W -).

Practical general training and experiences in the workplace. The college, with the employer, develops and documents an individualized plan for the student. The plan relates the workplace training and experiences to the student’s general and technical course of study. The guided external experiences may be paid or unpaid. This course may be repeated if topics and learning outcomes vary. Admission to this course requires proof of a passing score on the reading portion of the TSI test. Prerequisite: This course may not be taken until all DAAC courses are completed except with special permission from the instructor.

DFTG 1309 W – Basic Computer-Aided Drafting (3,2,2).

An introduction to computer-aided drafting. Emphasis is placed on setup; creating and modifying geometry; storing and retrieving predefined shapes; placing, rotating, and scaling objects, adding text and dimensions, using layers, coordinate systems, and plot/print to scale.

DITA 1300 W – Dietary Manager I (3,2,2).

Preparation for supervisory roles in food service departments. Emphasis on normal and therapeutic nutrition and food service systems management. Major topics include dietary and meal planning guidelines, sources and functions of nutrients, diet therapy, nutritional assessment and care, food production management and purchasing, and regulatory agencies.

DRAM 1120 A – Theatre Practicum (1,0,4).

A study in dramatic activities for performances and competition including: set, costume and lighting construction for all departmental productions. This course covers practical application of practice in one-set plays for spring competition. Drama majors and minors are required to enroll each semester.

DRAM 1121 A – Theatre Practicum (1,0,4).

A study in dramatic activities for performances and competition including: set, costume and lighting construction for all departmental productions. This course covers practical application of practice in one-set plays for spring competition. Drama majors and minors are required to enroll each semester.

DRAM 1310 A – Introduction to Theater (3,3,1).

A general survey of the major fields of dramatic art examined through historical perspective. Emphasis is placed on the various types and styles of plays, playwrights, elementary theory and practice of acting and directing, scenery and staging techniques, design, lighting and costuming. This course is for drama majors and non-majors, and satisfies the visual and performing arts component area of the TC Core Curriculum.

DRAM 1330 A – Stagecraft (3,2,4).

A beginner’s course in the art and crafts of the theater, costuming, scene design and construction, lighting and makeup. Students will gain practical experience working with one-act plays and major productions. Three hours lab.

DRAM 1351 A – Acting I (3,2,4).

An elementary study of the principles of acting, including: following stage directions, the use of stage areas, coordination of voice and body, and improvisation practices in scenes from plays. Students will gain practical experience in working with college productions. No prerequisite necessary.

DRAM 1352 A – Acting II (3,2,4).

continuation of Acting I with emphasis on characterization and creating a role, theories of acting and styles of acting, practical application in working with college productions. Prerequisite: DRAM 1351 A – – Acting I or permission of the instructor.

DRAM 2120 A – Theatre Practicum (1,0,4).

A study in dramatic activities for performances and competition including: set, costume and lighting construction for all departmental productions. This course covers practical application of practice in one-set plays for spring competition. Drama majors and minors are required to enroll each semester.

DRAM 2121 A – Theatre Practicum (1,0,4).

A study in dramatic activities for performances and competition including: set, costume and lighting construction for all departmental productions. This course covers practical application of practice in one-set plays for spring competition. Drama majors and minors are required to enroll each semester.

DRAM 2331 A – Stagecraft II (3,2,4).

Continued study and application of the methods and components of theatrical production which may include one or more of the following: theater facilities, scenery construction and painting, properties, lighting, costume, makeup, sound and theatrical management. (lab required)

DRAM 2336 A – Voice for the Theater (3,3,0).

A study of and practice in using the actor’s voice. Includes breath control, articulation-enunciation-pronunciation, projection, and phonetics. This course would be helpful to any student wishing to improve vocal performances and correct careless and ineffective speech habits. Required of drama majors.

DRAM 2366 A – Film Appreciation (3,2,4).

Emphasis on the analysis of the visual and aural aspects of selected motion pictures, dramatic aspects of narrative films, and historical growth and sociological effect of film as an art. This course satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts Component area of the TC Core Curriculum.

ECON 1301 A – Introduction to Economics (3,3,0).

A survey of microeconomic and macroeconomic principles for non-business majors. Microeconomic topics will include supply and demand, consumer behavior, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, international trade, and exchange rates. Macroeconomic topics will include national income, unemployment, inflation, business cycles, aggregate supply and demand, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

ECON 2301 A – Principles of Macroeconomics (3,3,0).

An analysis of the economy as a whole including measurement and determination of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy.

ECON 2302 A – Principles of Microeconomics (3,3,0).

Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade.

EDUC 1300 A – Learning Frameworks (3,3,0).

A study of the research and theory in the psychology of learning, cognition, and motivation; factors that impact learning, and application of learning strategies. Theoretical models of strategic learning, cognition, and motivation serve as the conceptual basis for the introduction of college-level student academic strategies. Students use assessment instruments (e.g., learning inventories) to help them identify their own strengths and weaknesses as strategic learners. Students are ultimately expected to integrate and apply the learning skills discussed across their own academic programs and become effective and efficient learners. Students developing these skills should be able to continually draw from the theoretical models they have learned. (Cross-listed as PSYC 1300) Required for all first time in college students.

EDUC 1301 A – Introduction to the Teaching Profession (3,3,1).

An enriched, integrated pre-service course and content experience that provides active recruitment and institutional support of students interested in a teaching career, especially in high need fields. The course provides students with opportunities to participate in early field observations at all levels of P-12 schools with varied and diverse student populations and provides students with support from college and school faculty, preferably in small cohort groups, for the purpose of introduction to and analysis of the culture of schooling and classrooms. Course content should be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards. Course must include a minimum of 16 contact hours of field experience in P-12 classrooms.

EDUC 2301 A – Introduction to Special Populations (3,3,1).

An enriched integrated pre-service course and content experience that provides an overview of schooling and classrooms from the perspectives of language, gender, socioeconomic status, ethnic, and academic diversity and equity with an emphasis on factors that facilitate learning. Lab provides the student with opportunities to participate in field observations at all levels of P-12 school with varied and diverse student populations; a minimum of 16 hours must be in classrooms. Course content is aligned with the State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities Standards.

ELPT 1325 W – National Electrical Code I (3,2,2).

An introductory study of the National Electric Code (NEC) for those employed in fields requiring knowledge of the Code. Emphasis on wiring design, protection, methods, and materials; equipment for general use; and basic calculations.

ELPT 1351 W – Electrical Machines (3,2,4).

Direct current (DC) motors, single-phase and polyphase alternating current (AC) motors, generators, and alternators. Emphasis on construction, characteristics, efficiencies, starting, and speed control.

ELPT 1429 W – Residential Wiring (4,2,6).

Wiring methods for single family and multi-family dwellings. Includes load calculations, service entrance sizing, proper grounding techniques, and associated safety procedures.

ELPT 1457 W – Industrial Wiring (4,2,6).

Wiring methods used for industrial installations. Included motor circuits, raceway and bus way installations, proper grounding techniques, and associated safety procedures.

EMSP 1338 W – Introduction to Advanced Practice (3,3,0).

Fundamental elements associated with emergency medical services to include preparatory practices, pathophysiology, medication administration, and related topics. Prerequisite: Current EMT licensure and current A.H.A.BLS Healthcare Provider certification or equivalent course completion. Concurrent registration with EMSP 1356, EMSP 2306, and EMSP 2361.

EMSP 1355 W – Trauma Management (3,2,3).

Detailed study of the knowledge and skills necessary to reach competence in the assessment and management of patients with traumatic injuries. Concurrent registration with EMSP 1338, EMSP 2243, EMSP 2305, and EMSP 2364. Prerequisites: EMSP 1388, 1356, 2306, 2330, 2361, 2362, 2434, and 2444.

EMSP 2243 W – Assessment Based Management (2,1,2).

The capstone course of the EMSP program. summative experience covering comprehensive, assessment-based patient care management for the paramedic level. Prerequisites: EMSP 1338, 1356, 2306, 2361, 2444, 2434, 2330, and 2362. Concurrent courses: EMSP 1355, 2305, and 2364.

EMSP 2305 W – EMS Operations (3,3,0).

Knowledge and skills to safely manage multi-casualty incidents and rescue situations; utilize air medical resources; identify hazardous materials and other specialized incidents. Prerequisites: EMSP 2361, EMSP 1338, EMSP 1356, EMSP 2444, EMSP 2434, EMSP 2330, and EMSP 2362. Concurrent registration with EMSP 1355, EMSP 2243, and EMSP 2364.

EMSP 2330 W – Special Populations (3,2,2).

Detailed study of the knowledge and skills necessary to reach competence in the assessment and management of ill or injured patients in diverse populations including neonatology, pediatrics, geriatrics, and other related topics. Prerequisites: EMSP 1338, EMSP 1356, EMSP 2306, and EMSP 2361. Concurrent registration with EMSP 2444, EMSP 2434, and EMSP 2362.

EMSP 2361 W – Clinical-Paramedic (3,0,12).

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Concurrent registration with EMSP 1338, EMSP 1356, and EMSP 2306.

EMSP 2362 W -Clinical-Paramedic (3,0,12).

Health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Prerequisites: EMSP 1338, EMSP 1356, EMSP 2306, and EMSP 2361. Concurrent registration with EMSP 2444, EMSP 2330, and EMSP 2434.

EMSP 2364 W – Practicum (3,0,21).

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. Prerequisites: EMSP 2361, EMSP 1338, EMSP 1356, EMSP 2306, EMSP 2444, EMSP 2434, EMSP 2330, and EMSP 2362. Concurrent registration with EMSP 1355, EMSP 2305, and EMSP 2243.

EMSP 2434 W – Medical Emergencies (4,4,0).

Detailed study of the knowledge and skills necessary to reach competence in the assessment and management of patients with medical emergencies including medical overview, neurology, gastroenterology, immunology, pulmonology, urology, hematology, endocrinology, toxicology, and other related topics. Prerequisites: EMSP 1338, EMSP 1356, EMSP 2306, and EMSP 2361. Concurrent registration with EMSP 2444, EMSP 2330, and EMSP 2362.

EMSP 2444 W – Cardiology (4,3,2).

Detailed study of the knowledge and skills necessary to reach competence in the assessment and management of patients with cardiac emergencies, including single and multi-lead EKG interpretation. Prerequisites: EMSP 1338, EMSP 1356, EMSP 2306, and EMSP 2361. Concurrent registration with EMSP 2330, EMSP 2434, and EMSP 2362.

ENGL 0020 A – NCBO-ABE English (0,1,0).

This intervention focuses on strategies and techniques of writing and composition and is open only to non-native speakers. Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1. Write a clear, well-organized, multi-paragraph essay using a logical sequence in a prescribed rhetorical mode. 2. Demonstrate ability to use the writing process by generating ideas, drafting, revising, and editing. 3. Demonstrate functional vocabulary knowledge in a variety of contexts at a level appropriate for college level courses. 4. Write coherent and cohesive sentences in a variety of common patterns. 5. Recognize and use proper English mechanics. 6. Demonstrate proficiency in basic skills related to research-based academic writing, such as paraphrasing, summarizing, quoting, and citing sources according to prescribed style guidelines. This course is Non-Transferrable and does not count toward an Associate degree at Texarkana College.

ENGL 0041 A – Integrated READ I/Writing (0,4,1).

This developmental course is a combined lecture/lab, performance-based course designed to develop a student’s critical reading and academic writing skills. The focus of the course will be on applying critical reading skills for organizing, analyzing, and retaining material and developing written work appropriate to the audience, purpose, situation, and length of the assignment. The course integrates preparation in basic academic reading skills with basic skills in writing in a variety of academic essays. This course has a required lab component. Successful completion of the course with a C or higher allows the student to advance to English 0042. The course is nontransferable and does not count toward an Associate Degree at Texarkana College. Students whose TSIA scores are in the following ranges (Reading 324-337 and Writing 330-349, Essay 2) must take this course.

ENGL 0042 A – Integrated READ II/Writing (0,4,1).

This developmental course is a combined lecture/lab, performance-based course designed to develop a students’ critical reading and academic writing skills. The focus on the course will be on applying critical reading skills for organizing, analyzing, and retaining material and developing written work appropriate to the audience, purpose, situation, and length of the assignment. The course integrates preparation in basic academic reading skills with basic skills in writing in a variety of academic essays. This course has a required lab component. This course fulfills TSI requirements for reading and writing if a student makes a C or higher in the course. The course is nontransferable and does not count toward an Associate Degree at Texarkana College. Students may take this course in a stand-alone version or as part of a co-requisite model with English 1301. Students whose TSIA scores are in the following ranges (Reading 338-345 and Writing 350-357, Essay 3) must take this course. Co-requisite: English 1301 paired section.

ENGL 0050 A – Base NCBO English (0,1,0).

This BASE NCBO focuses on integration of critical reading and academic writing skills. This intervention is for students assessed at BASE levels 3-4 and is part of a student’s co-enrollment (co- requisite) as a mainstreamed intensifier providing contact hours for additional, just-in-time instructional support for the student’s success in the developmental IRW course. The course is nontransferable and does not count toward an Associate Degree at Texarkana College. Students whose TSIA scores are in the following ranges (Reading 324-330; Writing 330-339, Essay 2) must take this course. Co-requisite: ENGL 0041.

ENGL 0060 A – NCBO for Writing

This NCBO focuses on integration of critical reading and academic writing skills. Successful completion of this intervention fulfills TSI requirements for reading and writing. This intervention is part of the student’s co-enrollment (co-requisite) as a mainstreamed intensifier providing contact hours for additional, just-in-time instructional support for the student’s success in English 1301. The course is nontransferable and does not count toward an Associate Degree at Texarkana College. Students whose TSIA scores are in the following ranges (Reading 346-350; Writing 358-362, Essay 3) may take this course. Co-requisite: ENGL 1301.

ENGL 1301 A – Composition I (3,3,1).

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis. Prerequisite: Completion of English 0042 with a C or better, TSI Reading and Writing Requirements.

ENGL 1302 A – Composition II (3,3,1).

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ENGL 1301.

ENGL 2311 A – Technical & Business Writing (3,3,0).

Intensive study of and practice in professional settings. Focus on the types of documents necessary to make decisions and take action on the job, such as proposals, reports, instructions, policies and procedures, e-mail messages, letters, and descriptions of products and services. Practice individual and collaborative processes involved in the creation of ethical and efficient documents. Prerequisite: Students taking this course must have satisfactorily completed ENGL 1301 with a grade of C or higher.

ENGL 2322 A – British Literature I (3,3,0).

A survey of the development of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the eighteenth century. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical, linguistic, and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions. Prerequisite: Students taking this course must have satisfactorily completed both semesters of Composition I & II, ENGL 1301, or the equivalent from another college or university and successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

ENGL 2323 A – British Literature II (3,3,0).

A survey of the development of British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions. Prerequisite: Students taking this course must have satisfactorily completed both semesters of Composition I & II, ENGL 1301, or the equivalent from another college or university and successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

ENGL 2327 A – American Literature I (3,3,0).

A survey of American literature from the period of exploration and settlement through the Civil War. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character. Prerequisite: Students taking this course must have satisfactorily completed both semesters of Composition I & II, ENGL 1301, or the equivalent from another college or university and successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

ENGL 2328 A – American Literature II (3,3,0).

A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character. Prerequisite: Students taking this course must have satisfactorily completed both semesters of Composition I & II, ENGL 1301, or the equivalent from another college or university and successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

ENGL 2332 A – World Literature I (3,3,0).

A survey of world literature from the ancient world through the sixteenth century. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions. Prerequisite: Students taking this course must have satisfactorily completed both semesters of Composition I & II, ENGL 1301, or the equivalent from another college or university and successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

ENGL 2333 A – World Literature II (3,3,0).

A survey of world literature from the seventeenth century to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions. Prerequisite: Students taking this course must have satisfactorily completed both semesters of Composition I & II, ENGL 1301, or the equivalent from another college or university and successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

ENGL 2341 A – Forms of Literature (3,3,0).

The study of one or more literary genres including, but not limited to, poetry, fiction, drama, and film. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI and successful completion of ENGL 1301.

ENGR 1201 A – Foundations of Engineering (2,3,1).

Introduction to the profession of engineering and the application of engineering principles to solve design problems. Topics covered include engineering sub-disciplines and ethics; use of the computer in problem solving, physical laws, and engineering statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or permission of the instructor.

ENGR 1304 A – Engineering Graphics I (3,2,2).

The principles of drafting the theory and practice of Orthographic Projection in the first and third quadrants, size and shape descriptions, geometric constructions, sections, auxiliary projections, revolutions, axonometrics, obliques, surface intersections, dimensioning, and size and geometric tolerancing.

GEOG 1303 A – World Regional Geography (3,3,0).

This course is an introduction to the world’s major regions seen through their defining physical, social, cultural, political, and economic features. These regions are examined in terms of their physical and human characteristics and their interactions. The course emphasizes relations among regions on issues such as trade, economic development, conflict, and the role of regions in the globalization process.

GOVT 2304 A – Introduction to Political Science (3,3,0).

An introductory survey of the field of political science. Includes an examination of the basic concepts of politics and political behavior, the history of the discipline, the scope and methods of political inquiry, public policy, political dynamics, and theory and organization of the modern state. This course may not be substituted for GOVT 2305 or 2306.

GOVT 2305 W – Federal Government (3,3,0).

Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

GOVT 2306 A – Texas Government (3,3,0).

Origin and development of the Texas constitution, structure and powers of state and local government, federalism and inter-governmental relations, political participation, the election process, public policy, and the political culture of Texas. Prerequisite: Successfully completed the reading portion of the TSI Test.

HART 2431 W – Advanced Electricity for HVAC (4,1,9).

Advanced electrical instruction and skill building in installation and servicing of air conditioning and refrigeration equipment including detailed instruction in motors and power distribution, motors, motor controls, and application of solid state devices.

HIST 1301 A – United States History I (3,3,0).

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government. Prerequisite: Successfully completed the reading portion of the TSI Test.

HIST 1302 A – United States History II (3,3,0).

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include: American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy. Prerequisite: Successfully completed the reading portion of the TSI Test.

INMT 2345 W – Industrial Troubleshooting (3,1,6).

An advanced study of the techniques used in troubleshooting various types of industrial equipment to include mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, and pneumatic systems and their control devices. Emphasis will be placed on the use of schematics and diagrams in conjunction with proper troubleshooting procedures. Second year course.

INTC 1357 W – AC/DC Motor Controls (3,2,2).

A study of electric motors and motor control devices common to a modern industrial environment. A presentation of motor characteristics with emphasis on starting, speed control, and stopping systems.

ITCC 1414 W – CCNA 1: Introduction to Networks (4,3,3).

This course covers networking architecture, structure, and functions; introduces the principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations to provide a foundation for the curriculum. Co-requisite: Must be concurrently enrolled in ITCC 1440.

HIST 2321 A – World Civilizations I (3,3,0).

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of the world from the emergence of human cultures through the 15th century. The course examines major cultural regions of the world in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania and their global interactions over time. Themes include the emergence of early societies, the rise of civilizations, the development of political and legal systems, religion and philosophy, economic systems and trans-regional networks of exchange. The course emphasizes the development, interaction and impact of global exchange.

HIST 2322 A – World Civilizations II (3,3,0).

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of the world from the 15th century to the present. The course examines major cultural regions of the world in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania and their global interactions over time. Themes include maritime exploration and transoceanic empires, nation/state formation and industrialization, imperialism, global conflicts and resolutions, and global economic integration. The course emphasizes the development, interaction and impact of global exchange.

INEW 2332 W – Comprehensive Software Project (3,2,4).

A comprehensive application of skills learned in previous courses in a simulated workplace. Covers the development, testing, and documenting of a complete software and/or hardware solution; includes coding, testing, maintenance, and documentation of a complete software and/or hardware solution.

INMT 1380 W – Cooperative Education/Manufacturing Technology Technician (3,1,20).

Career-related activities encountered in the student’s area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience (at least 20 hours per week). Includes a lecture component.

INMT 1417 W – Industrial Automation (2,4,4).

Applications of industrial automation systems including identification of system requirements, equipment integration, motors, controllers, and sensors. Coverage of set-up, maintenance, and testing of the automated system.

INMT 2301 W – Machinery Installation (3,1,6).

Students utilize skills acquired in previous studies. Machinery foundation, locations, installation, and alignment activities are practiced and tested. Emphasis is on the various methods of shaft alignment, including laser shaft alignment.

ITCC 1440 W – CCNA 2: Routing and Switching Essentials (4,3,3).

This course describes the architecture, components, and basic operation of routers and explains the basic principles of routing and routing protocols. It also provides an in-depth understanding of how switches operate and are implemented in the LAN environment for small and large networks. Co-requisite: Must be concurrently enrolled in ITCC 1414.

INTC 1457 W – AC/DC Motor Controls (2,4,4).

A study of electric motors and motor control devices common to a modern industrial environment. A presentation of motor characteristics with emphasis on starting, speed control, and stopping systems.

ITCC 2412 W – CCNA 3: Scaling Network (4,3,3).

CCNA R&S: Scaling Networks (ScaN) covers the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in larger and more complex networks. Students learn how to configure routers and switches using advanced protocols. Prerequisite: ITCC 1414 & ITCC 1440. Co-requisite: Must be concurrently enrolled in ITCC 2413.

ITCC 2413 W – CCNA 4: Connecting Networks (4,3,3).

WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network; enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Prerequisite: ITCC 1414 & ITCC 1440. Co-requisite: Must be concurrently enrolled in ITCC 2412.

ITMT 1303 W – Querying MS SQL Server with Transact-SQL (3,2,4).

Introductory coverage of the technical skills required to write basic Transact-SQL queries for Microsoft SQL Server. Describe uses of and ways to execute the Transact-SQL language; use querying tools; write SELECT queries; group and summarize data; join data from multiple tables; modify data in tables; query text fields with full search text; and describe how to create programming objects. Prerequisite: COSC 1336.

ITNW 1325 W – Fundamentals of Networking Technologies (3,2,4).

Instruction in networking essential concepts including the OSI reference model, network protocols, transmission media, and networking hardware and software. Identify media used in network communications, distinguish among them, and determine how to use them to connect servers and clients in a network; recognize the primary network architectures, identify their major characteristics, and determine which would be most appropriate for a proposed network; determine how to implement and support the major networking components, including the server, operating system, and clients; distinguish between Local Area Networks (LANs) and Wide Area Networks (WANs) and identify the components used to expand a LAN into a WAN; and determine how to implement connectivity devices in the larger LAN/WAN environment.

ITSC 1307 W – UNIX Operating System I (3,2,4).

A study of the UNIX operating system including multi-user concepts, terminal emulation, use of system editor, basic UNIX commands, and writing script files. Topics include introductory systems management concepts.

ITSE 1330 W – Introduction to C# Programming (3,2,4).

Introduction to computer programming using the C# language. Emphasis on the fundamentals of structured design, development, testing, implementation, and documentation. Includes coverage of language syntax, object oriented programming concepts, and user interface design.

ITSE 1331 W – Introduction to Visual BASIC Programming (3,2,4).

Introduction to computer programming using Visual BASIC. Emphasis on the fundamentals of structured design, development, testing, implementation, and documentation. Includes language syntax, data and file structures, input/ output devices, and files. The student will use structured programming techniques; develop correct executable programs; create appropriate documentation; and create applicable graphical user interfaces. Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

ITSE 2302 W – Intermediate Web Programming (3,2,4).

Intermediate applications for web authoring. Topics may include HTML and/or Java script. Use a combination of Java script, Java applets, Active X, and/or HTML to design and implement a web page. Prerequisite: IMED 1316.

ITSE 2349 W – Advanced Visual BASIC Programming (3,2,4).

Further applications of programming techniques using Visual BASIC. Topics include file access methods, data structures and modular programming, program testing and documentation. The student will develop correct, well documented programs containing complex data structures; incorporate complex input/output files handling techniques; develop graphical user interfaces to other software applications; and integrate external programs and libraries with Visual BASIC applications. Prerequisite: ITSE 1331.

ITSE 2386 W – Internship/Computer Programming (3,1,8).

This course is designed to provide the student with actual experience in a chosen area of data processing. Students will be provided qualified supervision to assist them in producing solutions to real business problems using a programming language of their choice. Students will research the problem, design the programs, and implement the system. The area chosen may be in microcomputer or mainframe programming environments. Prerequisite: Students must have taken all the courses necessary to implement their particular solution; therefore, they must have instructor approval.

ITSE 2417 W – Java Programming (4,2,4).

This course is designed to acquaint students with the fundamentals and concepts of the Java programming language. Primary emphasis will be placed on using visual development tools to create platform independent Java applets. Topics covered, in addition to learning the fundamentals of the language, include Java enhanced web pages and use of Java to connect to server databases. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor.

ITSW 1304 W – Introduction to Spreadsheets (lecture and lab hours will vary by program).

The objective of this course is for students to become proficient in the use of electronic spreadsheets. Emphasis is placed on creating basic to advanced spreadsheets having a professional appearance. At the completion of the class students will be knowledgeable of spreadsheet layout, cell formatting, relative, mixed, and absolute cell references, named cells, formula composition, graphing, goal seeking, spreadsheet databases, and commonly used spreadsheet functions such as Sum, Round, If, Pmt, Lookup, and various other financial and statistical functions. Prerequisite: BCIS 1305.

MATH 0020 W – Base NCBO Math

The two week NCBO is taken with both STEM and Non-Stem pathways. Topics in mathematics such as arithmetic operations, basic algebraic concepts and notation, geometry, and real and complex number systems. Non-transferable and does not count toward a degree at Texarkana College. Students whose TSI scores are in the following ranges (320-330) must take this STEM NCBO. Co-requisites: MATH 0021/MATH 0022 and PSYC/EDUC 1300.

MATH 0021 W – College Prep Math I (0,3,1).

The eight-week modular course is for STEM students and focuses on arithmetic operations on whole numbers, fractions, decimals, real numbers; ratio/proportion, percentages, measurements, polynomials, solving equations, interpretation of graphs and statistics, geometry; exponents, algebraic expressions and problem solving. Non-transferable and does not count toward a degree at Texarkana College. Students whose TSI scores are in the following ranges (331-344) must take this STEM NCBO. Co-requisites: MATH 0022 and PSYC/EDUC 1300.

MATH 0022 A – College Prep Math II (0,3,1).

The eight-week modular course is for STEM students and focuses on operations on and properties of real numbers, functions, exponents, scientific notation, solving equations and inequalities; problem solving; introduction to coordinate system and graphing; polynomials: operations including factoring, solving quadratic equations by factoring; radical expressions and equations. Non-transferable and does not count toward a degree at Texarkana College. Students whose TSI scores are in the following ranges (331-344) must take this STEM NCBO. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 0021 Co-requisite: PSYC/EDUC 1300.

MATH 0023 A – Foundations of Math (0,3,1).

This course is for Non-STEM students. Topics include numeracy with an emphasis on estimation and fluency with large numbers; evaluating expressions and formulas; rates, ratios, and proportions; percentages; solving equations; linear models; data interpretations including graphs and tables; verbal, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions; and exponential models. This course is non-transferable and does not count toward a degree at Texarkana College. Students whose TSI scores are in the following ranges (320-344) must take this STEM NCBO. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 0021 Co-requisite: PSYC/EDUC 1300.

MATH 0025 A – Non-STEM Base NCBO

The fourteen week NCBO is paired with Foundations of Math 0023. Topics in mathematics such as arithmetic operations, basic algebraic concepts and notation, geometry, and real and complex number systems. Non-transferable and does not count toward a degree at Texarkana College. Students whose TSI scores are in the following ranges (320-335) must take this STEM NCBO. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 0021 Co-requisite: PSYC/EDUC 1300.

MATH 0040 A – NCBO Math

The fourteen week NCBO is paired with Math 1314, 1324, or 1332 in the STEM and non-STEM path. Students re-inforce learning from the college credit course in relations and functions, inequalities, algebraic expressions and equations, sets, logic, and probability. Non-transferable and does not count toward a degree at Texarkana College. Students whose TSI scores are in the following ranges (345-349) must take this NCBO. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 0021 Co-requisite: PSYC/EDUC 1300 and MATH 1314, 1324, or 1332.

MATH 1314 A – College Algebra (3,3,1).

In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included. Prerequisite: MATH 0021 and MATH 0022 or satisfactory placement scores. (TSI Scores: 350 or above).

MATH 1316 A – Plane Trigonometry (3,3,0).

Topics include sets, ordered relations, number intervals, trigonometric functions, radian measure, variations and graphs of the functions, solution of right triangle and applications, trigonometric identities, equations, vector applications, and inverse functions, general triangle and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or satisfactory placement scores. (TSI Scores: 350 or above).

MATH 1324 A – Mathematics for Business & Social Sciences (3,3,1).

The application of common algebraic functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and rational, to problems in business, economics, and the social sciences are addressed. The applications include mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest and annuities; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; and probability, including expected value. Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement scores. (TSI Scores: 350 or above).

MATH 1325 A – Calculus for Business & Social Sciences (3,3,1).

This course is the basic study of limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization and graphing, and integration of elementary functions with emphasis on application in business, economics, and social sciences. This course is not a substitute for Math 2413 (Calculus I). Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or MATH 1324.

MATH 1332 A – Contemporary Mathematics (Quantitative Reasoning) (3,3,0).

Intended for Non STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). majors. Topics include introductory treatments of sets and logic, financial mathematics, probability and statistics with appropriate applications. Number sense, proportional reasoning, estimation, technology, and communication should be embedded throughout the course. Additional topics such as choosing and analyzing models to solve problems from real world settings. Prerequisite: MATH 0023, MATH 0022, or satisfactory placement scores. (TSI Scores: 350 or above).

MATH 1350 A – Mathematics for Teachers I (Formerly Fundamentals of Mathematics I). (3,3,0).

This course is intended to build or reinforce a foundation in fundamental mathematics concepts and skills. It includes the conceptual development of the following: sets, functions, numeration systems, number theory, and properties of the various number systems with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking. Special emphasis will be given to terminology, notation, skills, and approaches relevant to the elementary and middle school grades and to uses of manipulatives and technology in the classroom. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 College Algebra.

MATH 1351 A – Mathematics for Teachers II (Formerly Fundamentals of Mathematics II). (3,3,0).

This course is intended to build or reinforce a foundation in fundamental mathematic concepts and skills. It includes concepts of geometry, measurement, probability, and statistics, with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking. Special emphasis will be given to terminology, notation, skills, and approaches relevant to the elementary and middle school grades and to uses of manipulatives and technology in the classroom. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 College Algebra or MATH 1350.

MATH 1442 A – Elementary Statistical Methods (4,3,3).

An introductory course in statistical methods. Topics include collection and display of data, mean, standard deviation and variance, probability including the normal, binomial, and chi-square distributions. Other topics also included are sampling and sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing including nonparametric tests, regression, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement scores. (TSI 350 or above) or MATH 0023 or MATH 0022 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 2320 A – Differential Equations (3,3,1).

This course is designed to produce student proficiency in ordinary differential equations, including linear equations, systems of equations, equations with variable coefficients, existence and uniqueness of solutions, series solutions, singular points, transform methods, and boundary value problems; application of differential equations to real-world problems. Prerequisite: MATH 2415 or instructor approval.

MATH 2412 A – Pre-Calculus (4,4,1).

This course includes applications of algebra and trigonometry to the study of elementary functions and their graphs including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Topics from analytic geometry include conic sections, parametric equations and polar equations. Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement scores (TSI Scores: 350 or above) or MATH 0021 and MATH 0022.

MATH 2413 A – Calculus I (4,3,3).

Limits and continuity; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; definition of the derivative of a function and techniques of differentiation; applications of the derivative to maximizing or minimizing a function; the chain rule, mean value theorem, and rate of change problems; curve sketching; definite and indefinite integration of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental functions, with an application to calculation of areas. Prerequisites: MATH 2412 or 1316.

MATH 2414 A – Calculus II (4,3,3).

Differentiation and integration of transcendental functions; parametric equations and polar coordinates; techniques of integration; sequences and series; improper integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 2413.

MATH 2415 A – Calculus III (4,3,3).

Advanced topics in calculus, including vectors and vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, and Jacobians; application of the line integral, including Green’s Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and Stokes’ Theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 2414.

MRKG 1380 W – Cooperative Education – Marketing / Management (3,1,19).

Career-related activities encountered in the student’s area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component.

MRKG 1381 W – Cooperative Education – Marketing / Management (3,1,19).

Career-related activities encountered in the student’s area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component.

MRKG 2380 W – Cooperative Education – Marketing / Management (3,1,19).

Career-related activities encountered in the student’s area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component.

MRKG 2381 W – Cooperative Education – Marketing / Management (3,1,19).

Career-related activities encountered in the student’s area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component.

MRMT 1307 W – Medical Transcription I (3,1,7).

Development of transcription skills in transcribing medical reports including case studies, emergency room reports, history and physical examinations, radiology reports, operative reports, pathology reports, and discharge summaries.

MUAP 1101 A – Strings (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in violin, viola, or violoncello. Suitable solo and technical literature from the standard repertory will be used. One half-hour lessons per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1102 A – Strings (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in violin, viola, or violoncello. Suitable solo and technical literature from the standard repertory will be used. One half-hour lessons per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1131 A – Applied Brass (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, embouchure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1132 A – Applied Brass (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, embouchure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1157 A – Applied Percussion (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1158 A – Applied Percussion (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1161 A – Classical Guitar (1,1,1).

Private instruction in guitar. The student will study a variety of guitar music from the Renaissance through current trends. Assignments will be given according to each student’s ability. Course numbers are sequential. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour practice daily.

MUAP 1162 A – Classical Guitar (1,1,1).

Private instruction in guitar. The student will study a variety of guitar music from the Renaissance through current trends. Assignments will be given according to each student’s ability. Course numbers are sequential. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour practice daily.

MUAP 1165 A – Applied Organ (1,1,1).

Although this is a less concentrated course than MUAP 1265 – 1266; similar literature will be used. One half-hour lesson per week with one-hour practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1169 A – Applied Piano (1,1,1).

The course includes the study of suitable technical studies, major and minor scales (M.M.112) trans-I IV V I chord progression in all keys, sight reading, simple transposition, suitable compositions of Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionistic, and Contemporary composers. One half-hour lesson per week with a minimum of one-hour practice daily. The student shall attend a studio class as required and perform a recital at least once each semester. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers by memory. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1170 A – Applied Piano (1,1,1).

The course includes the study of suitable technical studies, major and minor scales (M.M.112) trans-I IV V I chord progression in all keys, sight reading, simple transposition, suitable compositions of Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionistic, and Contemporary composers. One half-hour lesson per week with a minimum of one-hour practice daily. The student shall attend a studio class as required and perform a recital at least once each semester. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers by memory. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1181 A – Applied Voice (1,1,1).

These courses will consist of one half-hour lesson each week with a minimum of four hours practice each week. The student will study the principles of vocal production and progress to exercise, and studies of increased difficulty. Examples from standard repertory will be included in the six memorized songs required for each semester. Performance for recitals and jury are required for each semester as well. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1182 A – Applied Voice (1,1,1).

These courses will consist of one half-hour lesson each week with a minimum of four hours practice each week. The student will study the principles of vocal production and progress to exercise, and studies of increased difficulty. Examples from standard repertory will be included in the six memorized songs required for each semester. Performance for recitals and jury are required for each semester as well. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1185 A – Applied Woodwind (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, brochure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1186 A – Applied Woodwind (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, brochure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1201 A – Strings (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in violin, viola, or violoncello. Suitable solo and technical literature from the standard repertory will be used. Two half-hour lessons, or one-hour lesson, per week with two hours of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1202 A – Strings (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in violin, viola, or violoncello. Suitable solo and technical literature from the standard repertory will be used. Two half-hour lessons, or one-hour lesson, per week with two hours of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1231 A – Applied Brass (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, embouchure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1232 A – Applied Brass (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, embouchure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1257 A – Applied Percussion (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1258 A – Applied Percussion (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1261 A – Classical Guitar (2,1,1).

Private instruction in guitar. The student will study a variety of guitar music from the Renaissance through current trends. Assignments will be given according to each student’s ability. One half-hour lesson per week with one-hour practice daily. Course numbers are sequential

MUAP 1262 A – Classical Guitar (2,1,1).

Private instruction in guitar. The student will study a variety of guitar music from the Renaissance through current trends. Assignments will be given according to each student’s ability. One half-hour lesson per week with one-hour practice daily. Course numbers are sequential

MUAP 1265 A – Applied Organ (2,1,1).

Students desiring to study organ should have studied piano previously and should have attained technical proficiency equivalent to MUAP 1269. One-hour lesson per week with a minimum of two hours of practice per day is required. The minimum representative requirements in repertory are these: Gleason: Method of Organ Playing Manual Technique; Pedal Techniques Composition for Manuals Studies and Compositions for Manual and Pedal Bach: Eight Little Preludes and Fugues Works from Orgelbuchlein; Works comparable in difficulty to Cathedral Prelude and Fugue; Easy compositions by modern American and foreign composers. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers, and perform in a recital at least once each semester. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1266 A – Applied Organ (2,1,1).

Students desiring to study organ should have studied piano previously and should have attained technical proficiency equivalent to MUAP 1269. One-hour lesson per week with a minimum of two hours of practice per day is required. The minimum representative requirements in repertory are these: Gleason: Method of Organ Playing Manual Technique; Pedal Techniques Composition for Manuals Studies and Compositions for Manual and Pedal Bach: Eight Little Preludes and Fugues Works from Orgelbuchlein; Works comparable in difficulty to Cathedral Prelude and Fugue; Easy compositions by modern American and foreign composers. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers, and perform in a recital at least once each semester. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1269 A – Applied Piano (2,1,1).

The minimum requirements are: Hanon, Czerny or other approved studies, all major and minor scales at various rhythms (M.M.112), arpeggios in root position. Bach-Three part inventions, and Well-Tempered Clavier, Sonatas of Mozart, Haydn or Beethoven, music of Chopin, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms or other Romantic composers; literature of the Impressionist and Contemporary composers. One-hour lesson or two half hour lessons per week and a minimum of two hours practice daily. The student shall attend studio class as required each week and perform a recital at least once each semester. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers by memory. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1270 A – Applied Piano (2,1,1).

The minimum requirements are: Hanon, Czerny or other approved studies, all major and minor scales at various rhythms (M.M.112), arpeggios in root position. Bach-Three part inventions, and Well-Tempered Clavier, Sonatas of Mozart, Haydn or Beethoven, music of Chopin, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms or other Romantic composers; literature of the Impressionist and Contemporary composers. One-hour lesson or two half hour lessons per week and a minimum of two hours practice daily. The student shall attend studio class as required each week and perform a recital at least once each semester. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers by memory. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1281 A – Applied Voice (2,1,1).

Two half-hour lessons each week with a minimum of six hours practice each week. The courses will provide studies for voice placement, support and flexibility. Repertory will include early Italian classics, English songs, and contemporary songs. Performance for recitals and jury required each semester. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1282 A – Applied Voice (2,1,1).

Two half-hour lessons each week with a minimum of six hours practice each week. The courses will provide studies for voice placement, support and flexibility. Repertory will include early Italian classics, English songs, and contemporary songs. Performance for recitals and jury required each semester. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1285 A – Applied Woodwind (2,1,1).

Individual instruction of instrument. A progressive course using Arban, Klose and allied technical studies for the individual student. All major and minor scales, suitable solo material to acquaint the student with both the instrument and the literature for that instrument. Two half-hour lessons weekly, two hours practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 1286 A – Applied Woodwind (2,1,1).

Individual instruction of instrument. A progressive course using Arban, Klose and allied technical studies for the individual student. All major and minor scales, suitable solo material to acquaint the student with both the instrument and the literature for that instrument. Two half-hour lessons weekly, two hours practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2101 A – Strings (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in violin, viola, or violoncello. Suitable solo and technical literature from the standard repertory will be used. One half-hour lessons per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2102 A – Strings (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in violin, viola, or violoncello. Suitable solo and technical literature from the standard repertory will be used. One half-hour lessons per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2131 A – Applied Brass (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, embouchure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2132 A – Applied Brass (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, embouchure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2157 A – Applied Percussion (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2158 A – Applied Percussion (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2161 A – Classical Guitar (1,1,1).

Private instruction in guitar. The student will study a variety of guitar music from the Renaissance through current trends. Assignments will be given according to each student’s ability. Course numbers are sequential. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour practice daily.

MUAP 2162 A – Classical Guitar (1,1,1).

Private instruction in guitar. The student will study a variety of guitar music from the Renaissance through current trends. Assignments will be given according to each student’s ability. Course numbers are sequential. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour practice daily.

MUAP 2169 A – Applied Piano (1,1,1).

The course includes the study of suitable technical studies, major and minor scales (M.M.112) trans-I IV V I chord progression in all keys, sight reading, simple transposition, suitable compositions of Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionistic, and Contemporary composers. One half-hour lesson per week with a minimum of one-hour practice daily. The student shall attend a studio class as required and perform a recital at least once each semester. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers by memory. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2170 A – Applied Piano (1,1,1).

The course includes the study of suitable technical studies, major and minor scales (M.M.112) trans-I IV V I chord progression in all keys, sight reading, simple transposition, suitable compositions of Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionistic, and Contemporary composers. One half-hour lesson per week with a minimum of one-hour practice daily. The student shall attend a studio class as required and perform a recital at least once each semester. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers by memory. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2181 A – Applied Voice (1,1,1).

These courses will consist of one half-hour lesson each week with a minimum of four hours practice each week. The student will study the principles of vocal production and progress to exercise, and studies of increased difficulty. Examples from standard repertory will be included in the six memorized songs required for each semester. Performance for recitals and jury are required for each semester as well. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2182 A – Applied Voice (1,1,1).

These courses will consist of one half-hour lesson each week with a minimum of four hours practice each week. The student will study the principles of vocal production and progress to exercise, and studies of increased difficulty. Examples from standard repertory will be included in the six memorized songs required for each semester. Performance for recitals and jury are required for each semester as well. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2185 A – Applied Woodwind (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, brochure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2186 A – Applied Woodwind (1,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, brochure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2201 A – Strings (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in violin, viola, or violoncello. Suitable solo and technical literature from the standard repertory will be used. Two half-hour lessons, or one-hour lesson, per week with two hours of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2202 A – Strings (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in violin, viola, or violoncello. Suitable solo and technical literature from the standard repertory will be used. Two half-hour lessons, or one-hour lesson, per week with two hours of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2231 A – Applied Brass (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, embouchure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2232 A – Applied Brass (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Correct tone production, embouchure, fingerings for the various instruments. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2257 A – Applied Percussion (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2258 A – Applied Percussion (2,1,1).

Individual instruction in instruments for students. Includes both solo literature and technical work. One half-hour lesson per week with one hour of practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2261 A – Classical Guitar (2,1,1).

Private instruction in guitar. The student will study a variety of guitar music from the Renaissance through current trends. Assignments will be given according to each student’s ability. One half-hour lesson per week with one-hour practice daily. Course numbers are sequential

MUAP 2262 A – Classical Guitar (2,1,1).

Private instruction in guitar. The student will study a variety of guitar music from the Renaissance through current trends. Assignments will be given according to each student’s ability. One half-hour lesson per week with one-hour practice daily. Course numbers are sequential

MUAP 2265 A – Applied Organ (2,1,1).

Students desiring to study organ should have studied piano previously and should have attained technical proficiency equivalent to MUAP 1269. One-hour lesson per week with a minimum of two hours of practice per day is required. The minimum representative requirements in repertory are these: Gleason: Method of Organ Playing Manual Technique; Pedal Techniques Composition for Manuals Studies and Compositions for Manual and Pedal Bach: Eight Little Preludes and Fugues Works from Orgelbuchlein; Works comparable in difficulty to Cathedral Prelude and Fugue; Easy compositions by modern American and foreign composers. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers, and perform in a recital at least once each semester. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2266 A – Applied Organ (2,1,1).

Students desiring to study organ should have studied piano previously and should have attained technical proficiency equivalent to MUAP 1269. One-hour lesson per week with a minimum of two hours of practice per day is required. The minimum representative requirements in repertory are these: Gleason: Method of Organ Playing Manual Technique; Pedal Techniques Composition for Manuals Studies and Compositions for Manual and Pedal Bach: Eight Little Preludes and Fugues Works from Orgelbuchlein; Works comparable in difficulty to Cathedral Prelude and Fugue; Easy compositions by modern American and foreign composers. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers, and perform in a recital at least once each semester. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2269 A – Applied Piano (2,1,1).

The minimum requirements are: Hanon, Czerny or other approved studies, all major and minor scales at various rhythms (M.M.112), arpeggios in root position. Bach-Three part inventions, and Well-Tempered Clavier, Sonatas of Mozart, Haydn or Beethoven, music of Chopin, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms or other Romantic composers; literature of the Impressionist and Contemporary composers. One-hour lesson or two half hour lessons per week and a minimum of two hours practice daily. The student shall attend studio class as required each week and perform a recital at least once each semester. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers by memory. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2270 A – Applied Piano (2,1,1).

The minimum requirements are: Hanon, Czerny or other approved studies, all major and minor scales at various rhythms (M.M.112), arpeggios in root position. Bach-Three part inventions, and Well-Tempered Clavier, Sonatas of Mozart, Haydn or Beethoven, music of Chopin, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms or other Romantic composers; literature of the Impressionist and Contemporary composers. One-hour lesson or two half hour lessons per week and a minimum of two hours practice daily. The student shall attend studio class as required each week and perform a recital at least once each semester. The student shall perform for jury each semester the requested numbers by memory. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2281 A – Applied Voice (2,1,1).

Two half-hour lessons each week with a minimum of six hours practice each week. The courses will provide studies for voice placement, support and flexibility. Repertory will include early Italian classics, English songs, and contemporary songs. Performance for recitals and jury required each semester. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2282 A – Applied Voice (2,1,1).

Two half-hour lessons each week with a minimum of six hours practice each week. The courses will provide studies for voice placement, support and flexibility. Repertory will include early Italian classics, English songs, and contemporary songs. Performance for recitals and jury required each semester. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2285 A – Applied Woodwind (2,1,1).

Individual instruction of instrument. A progressive course using Arban, Klose and allied technical studies for the individual student. All major and minor scales, suitable solo material to acquaint the student with both the instrument and the literature for that instrument. Two half-hour lessons weekly, two hours practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUAP 2286 A – Applied Woodwind (2,1,1).

Individual instruction of instrument. A progressive course using Arban, Klose and allied technical studies for the individual student. All major and minor scales, suitable solo material to acquaint the student with both the instrument and the literature for that instrument. Two half-hour lessons weekly, two hours practice daily. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 1122 A – Band (1,0,3).

The band performs as a concert band during the school year. Open to all students with approval of the director. To be eligible or spring semester activities, a student must participate in both fall and spring semesters or have special permission of the director. This course is required for all instrumental majors.

MUEN 1123 A – Band (1,0,3).

The band performs as a concert band during the school year. Open to all students with approval of the director. To be eligible or spring semester activities, a student must participate in both fall and spring semesters or have special permission of the director. This course is required for all instrumental majors.

MUEN 1127 A – Community Band (1,0,3).

For persons that have played in concert bands before with a desire to play again. Students must have knowledge of music fundamentals and instrument in good playing condition.

MUEN 1128 A – Community Band (1,0,3).

For persons that have played in concert bands before with a desire to play again. Students must have knowledge of music fundamentals and instrument in good playing condition.

MUEN 1131 A – Small Instrumental Ensemble (1,0,3).

Students study and perform all styles of music, including pop and jazz. Student arranging, composing and conducing is encouraged. Students are responsible for providing their won instruments and for participating in concerts or campus appearances as scheduled.

MUEN 1132 A – Small Instrumental Ensemble (1,0,3).

Students study and perform all styles of music, including pop and jazz. Student arranging, composing and conducing is encouraged. Students are responsible for providing their won instruments and for participating in concerts or campus appearances as scheduled.

MUEN 1141 A – TC Choir (1,0,3).

The Texarkana College Choir makes local and regional appearances. Open to all students with the approval of the director. Responsibility for public appearances is necessary for membership. Each course carries one-hour credit. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 1142 A – TC Choir (1,0,3).

The Texarkana College Choir makes local and regional appearances. Open to all students with the approval of the director. Responsibility for public appearances is necessary for membership. Each course carries one-hour credit. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 1147 A – Texarkana Regional Chorale (1,0,3).

The Texarkana Regional Chorale is a performing ensemble for singers in the community or enrolled at TC. A placement audition is required for all participants. The Chorale performs at least one concert per semester in various venues and also performs with orchestra regularly. Members may not miss more than three (3) rehearsals and are required to attend dress rehearsal in order to perform in concert. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 1148 A – Texarkana Regional Chorale (1,0,3).

The Texarkana Regional Chorale is a performing ensemble for singers in the community or enrolled at TC. A placement audition is required for all participants. The Chorale performs at least one concert per semester in various venues and also performs with orchestra regularly. Members may not miss more than three (3) rehearsals and are required to attend dress rehearsal in order to perform in concert. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 1154 A – Vocal Ensemble (1,3,0).

The TC Singers are composed of superior voices selected by the director. This group performs as a single unit as in conjunction with concert choir appearances. Prerequisites: MUEN 1154 is a prerequisite to MUEN 1155, MUEN 1155 is a prerequisite to MUEN 2154, MUEN 2154 is a prerequisite to MUEN 2155. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 1155 A – Vocal Ensemble (1,3,0).

The TC Singers are composed of superior voices selected by the director. This group performs as a single unit as in conjunction with concert choir appearances. Prerequisites: MUEN 1154 is a prerequisite to MUEN 1155, MUEN 1155 is a prerequisite to MUEN 2154, MUEN 2154 is a prerequisite to MUEN 2155. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 2122 A – Band (1,0,3).

The band performs as a concert band during the school year. Open to all students with approval of the director. To be eligible or spring semester activities, a student must participate in both fall and spring semesters or have special permission of the director. This course is required for all instrumental majors.

MUEN 2123 A – Band (1,0,3).

The band performs as a concert band during the school year. Open to all students with approval of the director. To be eligible or spring semester activities, a student must participate in both fall and spring semesters or have special permission of the director. This course is required for all instrumental majors.

MUEN 2127 A – Community Band (1,0,3).

For persons that have played in concert bands before with a desire to play again. Students must have knowledge of music fundamentals and instrument in good playing condition.

MUEN 2128 A – Community Band (1,0,3).

For persons that have played in concert bands before with a desire to play again. Students must have knowledge of music fundamentals and instrument in good playing condition.

MUEN 2131 A – Small Instrumental Ensemble (1,0,3).

Students study and perform all styles of music, including pop and jazz. Student arranging, composing and conducing is encouraged. Students are responsible for providing their won instruments and for participating in concerts or campus appearances as scheduled.

MUEN 2132 A – Small Instrumental Ensemble (1,0,3).

Students study and perform all styles of music, including pop and jazz. Student arranging, composing and conducing is encouraged. Students are responsible for providing their won instruments and for participating in concerts or campus appearances as scheduled.

MUEN 2141 A – TC Choir (1,0,3).

The Texarkana College Choir makes local and regional appearances. Open to all students with the approval of the director. Responsibility for public appearances is necessary for membership. Each course carries one-hour credit. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 2142 A – TC Choir (1,0,3).

The Texarkana College Choir makes local and regional appearances. Open to all students with the approval of the director. Responsibility for public appearances is necessary for membership. Each course carries one-hour credit. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 2147 A – Texarkana Regional Chorale (1,0,3).

The Texarkana Regional Chorale is a performing ensemble for singers in the community or enrolled at TC. A placement audition is required for all participants. The Chorale performs at least one concert per semester in various venues and also performs with orchestra regularly. Members may not miss more than three (3) rehearsals and are required to attend dress rehearsal in order to perform in concert. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 2148 A – Texarkana Regional Chorale (1,0,3).

The Texarkana Regional Chorale is a performing ensemble for singers in the community or enrolled at TC. A placement audition is required for all participants. The Chorale performs at least one concert per semester in various venues and also performs with orchestra regularly. Members may not miss more than three (3) rehearsals and are required to attend dress rehearsal in order to perform in concert. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 2154 A – Vocal Ensemble (1,3,0).

The TC Singers are composed of superior voices selected by the director. This group performs as a single unit as in conjunction with concert choir appearances. Prerequisites: MUEN 1154 is a prerequisite to MUEN 1155, MUEN 1155 is a prerequisite to MUEN 2154, MUEN 2154 is a prerequisite to MUEN 2155. Course numbers are sequential.

MUEN 2155 A – Vocal Ensemble (1,3,0).

The TC Singers are composed of superior voices selected by the director. This group performs as a single unit as in conjunction with concert choir appearances. Prerequisites: MUEN 1154 is a prerequisite to MUEN 1155, MUEN 1155 is a prerequisite to MUEN 2154, MUEN 2154 is a prerequisite to MUEN 2155. Course numbers are sequential.

MUSI 1116 A – Elementary Sight Singing and Ear Training I (1,0,3).

This course of study includes singing in the treble and bass clefs, introduction to alto and tenor clefs, major and minor scales, melodies with harmonic backgrounds of the principal chords, aural study of beats, their division and subdivisions, intervals and melodies, and harmonic progressions of the principal chords. Keyboard application theory.

MUSI 1117 A – Elementary Sight Singing and Ear Training II (continued) (1,0,3).

Singing melodies with harmonic backgrounds of all diatonic triads, the dominant seventh and supertonic seventh chords. Aural study of syncopation, intervals and melodies with any diatonic harmonic background, diatonic harmonic progression including the dominant seventh and supertonic seventh chords. Keyboard application theory.

MUSI 1162 A – Vocal Diction (1,1,1).

This course will provide for molding the pronunciation of lyrics in the principal singing languages. Emphasis on the international phonetic system will be stressed.

MUSI 1181 A – Piano Class I (1,1,1).

This course introduces the beginning student to fundamental keyboard technique. The course is designed for non-music majors but will also satisfy the music major applied piano requirement for all music students except piano majors or advanced pianists. The music major will work toward the requirements for a barrier exam. Course numbers are sequential.

MUSI 1182 A – Piano Class II (1,1,1).

This course introduces the beginning student to fundamental keyboard technique. The course is designed for non-music majors but will also satisfy the music major applied piano requirement for all music students except piano majors or advanced pianists. The music major will work toward the requirements for a barrier exam. Course numbers are sequential.

MUSI 1183 A – Voice Class I (1,1,2).

This course will provide studies for increasing the power, range and quality in vocal production. Composition from the standard repertory will be performed by individual class members. Two hours per week including lecture and laboratory and two hours practice required each week. Prerequisites: MUSI 1183 is a prerequisite to MUSI 1184, MUSI 1184 is a prerequisite to MUSI 2183, MUSI 2183 is a prerequisite to MUSI 2184. Course numbers are sequential.

MUSI 1184 A – Voice Class II (1,1,2).

This course will provide studies for increasing the power, range and quality in vocal production. Composition from the standard repertory will be performed by individual class members. Two hours per week including lecture and laboratory and two hours practice required each week. Prerequisites: MUSI 1183 is a prerequisite to MUSI 1184, MUSI 1184 is a prerequisite to MUSI 2183, MUSI 2183 is a prerequisite to MUSI 2184. Course numbers are sequential.

MUSI 1192 A – Guitar Class (1,1,1).

Beginning class instruction in guitar. This course is designed for the non-music major. The class covers a variety of genres selected from the interests of class participants. Must furnish own guitar.

MUSI 1306 A – Music Appreciation (3,3,0).

This course is designed for anyone who wishes a broader knowledge of the great music of civilization. Emphasis will be placed on listening and enjoying music of the masters. Open to all students without prerequisite.

MUSI 1311 A – Music Theory I (3,3,1).

An introduction to elementary harmony including a study of scales, intervals, major and minor triads, with inversion and application. Part writing of figured bass exercises and melodic harmonizations requiring the principal triads. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on placement test or MUSI 1303.

MUSI 1312 A – Music Theory II (3,3,1).

This course of study includes part writing figured bass exercises and harmonic backgrounds of all diatonic triads, the dominant seventh chords and non-harmonic tones. Enlargement of the period in melodic composition. Prerequisite: MUSI 1311 and MUSI 1116.

MUSI 2116 A – Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training I (1,0,3).

Singing modulations to closely related keys modal melodies. Aural study of superimposition, compound intervals, melodic and harmonic modulation. All diatonic seventh chords. Keyboard application of theory. Prerequisite: MUSI 1312 and MUSI 1117. This course must be taken in conjunction with MUSI 2311.

MUSI 2117 A – Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training II (1,0,3).

Singing remote modulations and more difficult melodies. Aural study of unusual and mixed meters, remote modulation, altered chords, 9th, 11th, and 13th chords. Keyboard application of theory skills. Prerequisite: MUSI 2116. This course must be taken in conjunction with MUSI 2312.

MUSI 2181 A – Piano Class III (1,1,1).

This course introduces the beginning student to fundamental keyboard technique. The course is designed for non-music majors but will also satisfy the music major applied piano requirement for all music students except piano majors or advanced pianists. The music major will work toward the requirements for a barrier exam. Course numbers are sequential.

MUSI 2182 A – Piano Class IV (1,1,1).

This course introduces the beginning student to fundamental keyboard technique. The course is designed for non-music majors but will also satisfy the music major applied piano requirement for all music students except piano majors or advanced pianists. The music major will work toward the requirements for a barrier exam. Course numbers are sequential.

MUSI 2183 A – Voice Class III (1,1,2).

This course will provide studies for increasing the power, range and quality in vocal production. Composition from the standard repertory will be performed by individual class members. Two hours per week including lecture and laboratory and two hours practice required each week. Prerequisites: MUSI 1183 is a prerequisite to MUSI 1184, MUSI 1184 is a prerequisite to MUSI 2183, MUSI 2183 is a prerequisite to MUSI 2184. Course numbers are sequential.

MUSI 2184 A – Voice Class IV (1,1,2).

This course will provide studies for increasing the power, range and quality in vocal production. Composition from the standard repertory will be performed by individual class members. Two hours per week including lecture and laboratory and two hours practice required each week. Prerequisites: MUSI 1183 is a prerequisite to MUSI 1184, MUSI 1184 is a prerequisite to MUSI 2183, MUSI 2183 is a prerequisite to MUSI 2184. Course numbers are sequential.

MUSI 2312 A – Music Theory IV (3,3,1).

Advanced harmony part writing and keyboard analysis and writing of more advanced tonal harmony including chromaticism and extended tertian structures. Introduction to 20th century compositional procedures and survey of the traditional large forms of composition. Correlated study at the keyboard.

NURA 1160 A – Clinical for Nurse Assistant/Aide (1,0,5).

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Enrollment in this course requires the student to complete a criminal background check and have a negative urine drug screen. The cost for the background check and drug screen are not included in tuition and fees. The student must also have a clear Employability Check on the Texas Department of Aging and Disability registry.

NURA 1301 A – Nurse Aide for Health Care (3,2,3).

Knowledge, skills, and abilities essential to provide basic care to residents of long-term care facilities. Topics include resident’s rights, communication, safety, observation, reporting and assisting residents in maintaining basic comfort and safety. Emphasis on effective interaction with members of the health care team. Enrollment in this course requires the student to complete a criminal background check and have a negative urine drug screen. The cost for the background check and drug screen are not included in tuition and fees. The student must also have a clear Employability Check on the Texas Department of Aging and Disability registry.

PHED 1127 A – Rhythmic Aerobics II (1,0,2).

A continuation of Rhythmic Aerobics I. Aerobic and anaerobic workouts using music to gain the aerobic training effects of cardiovascular and to tone/ sculpt for those who are seeking definition of muscle.

PHED 1128 A – Yoga/Pilates for Fitness (1,1,1).

Yoga and Pilates methods of body conditioning are unique systems of stretching and strengthening exercises. A combination of these will strengthen and tone muscles, improve posture, provide flexibility and balance, unite body and mind, and create a streamlined body-shape.

PHED 1129 A – Yoga/Pilates for Fitness II (1,0,2).

Yoga and Pilates methods of body conditioning are unique systems of stretching and strengthening exercises. A combination of these will strengthen and tone muscles, improve posture, provide flexibility and balance, unite body and mind, and create a streamlined body-shape.

PHED 1134 A – Walking for Fitness (1,1,1).

The objective of this course is to design an individualized training program for each student so that walking may become a lifetime activity. Goals of the course include increasing cardiovascular endurance and maintaining a desirable body weight. In addition, students will have the opportunity to develop muscular strength, muscular endurance and flexibility. Three hours of activity each week.

PHED 1141 A – Body Sculpting (1,0,2).

For those individuals who are seeking a better body by conditioning and toning in a safe and consistent workout with the use of deep and healthy breathing and coordination of strength and flexibility.

PHED 1304 A – Personal / Community Health (3,3,0).

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals, concepts, strategies, applications, and contemporary trends related to understanding personal and/or community health issues. This course also focuses on empowering various populations with the ability to practice health living, promote health lifestyles, and enhance individual well-being.

PHIL 1301 A – Introduction to Philosophy (3,3,0).

A study of major issues in philosophy and/or the work of major philosophical figures in philosophy. Topics in philosophy may include theories of reality, theories of knowledge, theories of value, and their practical applications.

PHRA 1202 W – Pharmacy Law (2,2,0).

Overview of federal and state laws governing the practice of pharmacy. The role of the pharmacy technician and the pharmacist and their associated responsibilities. Includes Code of Ethics, patient confidentiality, and a comparison of legal and ethical aspects.

PHRA 1313 W – Community Pharmacy Practice (3,2,2).

Introduction to the skills necessary to process, prepare, label, and maintain records of prescriptions in a community pharmacy to include customer service, count and pour techniques, prescription calculations, drug selection and preparation, over-the-counter drugs, inventory management and legal parameters.

PHRA 1315 W – Pharmacy Terminology (3,2,2).

A study of word origins and structure through the introduction of prefixes, suffixes, and root words as it relates to a pharmaceutical setting. Focuses on translation and recognition of commonly used pharmacy abbreviations.

PHRA 1449 W – Institutional Pharmacy Practice (4,3,2).

Fundamentals of the diverse roles and practice of pharmacy technicians in an institutional pharmacy setting. In-depth coverage of hospital pharmacy organization, work flow and personnel, safety techniques, data entry, packaging and labeling operations, inpatient drug distribution systems including investigational drugs, continuous quality improvement and inventory control.

PHYS 1101 A – College Physics I (lab) (1,0,3).

This laboratory-based course accompanies PHYS 1301. Laboratory activities will reinforce fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of classical mechanics and thermodynamics, including harmonic motion, mechanical waves and sound, physical systems, Newton’s Laws of Motion, and gravitation and other fundamental forces; emphasis will be on problem solving. Pre/Co-requisite: PHYS 1301

PHYS 1102 A – College Physics II (lab) (1,0,3).

Laboratory class for PHYS 1302. Laboratory activities will reinforce fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electrostatics, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light optics, and modern physics topics; with emphasis on problem solving. Pre/Co-requisite: PHYS 1302.

PHYS 1301 A – College Physics I (lecture) (3,3,0).

Fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of classical mechanics and thermodynamics, including harmonic motion, mechanical waves and sound, physical systems, Newton’s Laws of Motion, and gravitation and other fundamental forces; with emphasis on problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 AND MATH 1316, or MATH 2312/2412 or concurrent enrollment. Recommended co-requisite: PHYS 1101.

PHYS 1302 A – College Physics II (lecture) (3,3,0).

Fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electrostatics, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light optics, and modern physics topics; with emphasis on problem solving. Prerequisite: PHYS 1301 or permission of instructor. Recommended co-requisite: PHYS 1102.

PHYS 2325 A – University Physics I (lecture) (3,3,0).

Fundamental principles of physics, using calculus, for science, computer science, and engineering majors; the principles and applications of classical mechanics, including harmonic motion, physical systems and thermodynamics; and emphasis on problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH 2413. Co-requisite: MATH 2414. Recommended co-requisite PHYS 2125.

PHYS 2326 A – University Physics II (lecture) (3,3,0).

Principles of physics for science, computer science, and engineering majors, using calculus, involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2325 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: MATH 2415 and Recommended co-requisite PHYS 2126.

POFI 2340 W – Advanced Word Processing (3,3,1).

This course is designed to acquaint the student with principles of data entry and word processing. Extensive formatting for technical documents, merging techniques, macros, graphics and desktop publishing are covered. Emphasis on business applications will be incorporated by implementing advanced features; importing data; and incorporating graphics, collaborative, and special functions to enhance documents.

POFM 2286 W – Internship – Medical Office Assistant (2,0,6).

An experience external to the college for an advanced student in a specialized field involving a written agreement between the educational institution and a medical facility. Mentored and supervised by a workplace employee, the student achieves objectives that are developed and documented by the college and that are directly related to special occupational outcomes. This may be a paid or unpaid experience.

POFT 1291 W – Special Topics in Business Communications (2,1,2).

Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency.

POFT 1492 W – Special Topics in Administrative Assistant/Secretarial Science, General (4,1,5).

Topics address skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors relevant to the professional development of the student in his/her specialized areas of interest. The student completes a minimum of three of the ten special topics mini courses offered including Medical Terminology, Medical Office Procedures, Medical Machine Transcription, Legal Office Projects, Legal Terminology and Transcription, Excel Spreadsheets, Computerized Accounting, Internet Office Projects, Microsoft PowerPoint Presentations

POFT 2287 W – Internship-Admin. Assist/Sec. Science Gen. (2,0,6).

An experience external to the college for an advanced student in a specialized field involving a written agreement between the educational institution and a business or industry. Mentored and supervised by a workplace employee, the student achieves objectives that are developed and documented by the college and that are directly related to special occupational outcomes. This may be a paid or unpaid experience. This course may be repeated if topics and learning outcomes vary. Must be taken in conjunction with at least one POFT class.

POFT 2387 W – Internship-Admin. Assist/Sec. Science Gen.

(lecture and lab hours will vary by program) An experience external to the college for an advanced student in a specialized field involving a written agreement between the educational institution and a business or industry. Mentored and supervised by a workplace employee, the student achieves objectives that are developed and documented by the college and that are directly related to special occupational outcomes. This may be a paid or unpaid experience. This course may be repeated if topics and learning outcomes vary. Must be taken in conjunction with at least one POFT class.

PSTR 1301 W – Fundamentals of Baking (3,1,6).

Fundamentals of baking including dough, quick breads, pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, and doughnuts. Instruction in flours, fillings, and ingredients. Topics include baking terminology, tool and equipment use, formula conversions, functions of ingredients, and the evaluation of baked products.

PSYC 1300 W – Learning Frameworks (3,3,0).

A study of the research and theory in the psychology of learning, cognition, and motivation; factors that impact learning, and application of learning strategies. Theoretical models of strategic learning, cognition, and motivation serve as the conceptual basis for the introduction of college-level student academic strategies. Students use assessment instruments (e.g., learning inventories) to help them identify their own strengths and weaknesses as strategic learners. Students are ultimately expected to integrate and apply the learning skills discussed across their own academic programs and become effective and efficient learners. Students developing these skills should be able to continually draw from the theoretical models they have learned. (Cross-listed as EDUC 1300) Required for all first time in college students.

PSYC 2301 A – General Psychology (3,3,0).

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

PSYC 2308 A – Child Psychology (3,3,0).

This course will address psychological development from conception through middle childhood with references to physical, cognitive, social and personality changes. Students will examine the interplay of biological factors, human interaction, social structures and cultural forces in development. Prerequisite: none; PSYC 2301 recommended.

RNSG 1412 W – Nursing Care of the Childbearing and Childrearing Family (4,4,0).

Study of the concepts related to the provision of nursing care for childbearing and childrearing families; application of systematic problem-solving processes and critical thinking skills, including a focus on the childbearing family during the perinatal periods and the childbearing family from birth to adolescence; and competency in knowledge, judgment, skill, and professional values within a legal/ethical framework. Prerequisites: BIOL 2301/2101, 2302/2102, and 2320/2120; PSYC 2301 and 2314; RNSG, 1413, 1360, and AHA/BLS-HCP. Co-requisites: ENGL 1301; RNSG 1261, 1431, and 1260.

RNSG 1413 W – Foundations for Nursing Practice (4,3,3).

Introduction to the role of the professional nurse as provider of patient-centered care, patient safety advocate, member of health care team, and member of the profession. Content includes fundamental concepts of nursing practice, history of professional nursing, and a systematic framework for decision-making and critical thinking. Emphasis on knowledge, judgment, skills and professional values within a legal/ethical framework. This course lends itself to a blocked approach. Prerequisites: BIOL 2301/2101, 2302/2102, and 2320/2120; PSYC 2301 and 2314; AHA/BLS-HCP. Co-requisites: RNSG 1360.

RNSG 1431 W – Principles of Clinical Decision-Making (4,4,0).

Examination of selected principles related to the continued development of the professional nurse as a provider of patient-centered care, patient safety advocate, member of health care team, and member of a profession. Emphasis on clinical decision making for clients in medical-surgical settings experiencing health problems involving fluid and electrolytes; perioperative care; pain; respiratory disorders; peripheral vascular disorders; immunologic disorders; and infectious disorders. Discussion of knowledge, judgment, skills, and professional values within a legal/ ethical framework. Prerequisites: BIOL 2301/2101, 2302/2102, and 2320/2120. PSYC 2301 and 2314; RNSG 1201,1413, 1360; and AHA/ BLS-HCP. Co-requisites: ENGL 1301; RNSG 1260, 1412, 1261.

RNSG 1441 W – Common Concepts of Adult Health (4,3,3).

Basic integration of the role of the professional nurse as a provider of patient-centered care, patient safety advocate, member of health care team, and member of the profession. Study of the common concepts of caring for adult patients and families with medical-surgical health care needs related to body systems, emphasizing knowledge, judgment, skills, and professional values within a legal/ethical framework. This course lends itself to a blocked approach. Prerequisites: BIOL 2301/2101, 2302/2102, 2320/2120; PSYC 2301 and 2314; RNSG 1413, 1360, 1431, 1260, 1412, 1261 for Basic Students; RNSG 1327, 1251, and 1160 for Transition Students and AHA/BLS-HCP. Co-requisites: ARTS 1301 or MUSI 1306 or DRAM 1310; RNSG 2360 and RNSG 2213.

RNSG 1443 W – Complex Concepts of Adult Health (4,3,3).

Integration of previous knowledge and skills related to common adult health needs into the continued development of the professional nurse as a provider of patient-centered care, patient safety advocate, member of health care team, and member of a profession in the care of adult patients and families with complex medical-surgical health care needs associated with body systems. Emphasis on complex knowledge, judgments, skills, and professional values within a legal/ethical framework. Prerequisites: BIOL 2301/2101, 2302/2102, and 2320/2120; PSYC 2301 and 2314; ARTS 1301 or MUSI 1306 or DRAM 1310; RNSG 1413, 1360, 1431, 1260, 1412, 1261, 1441, 2360, and 2213 for Basic Students. RNSG 1327, 1251, 1441, 2360, and 2213 for Transition students; and AHA/BLS-HCP. Co-requisites: RNSG 2560 and 2121.

RNSG 2213 W – Mental Health Nursing (2,2,0).

Principles and concepts of mental health psychopathology, and treatment modalities related to the nursing care of clients and their families. Prerequisites: BIOL 2301/2101, 2302/2102, and 2320/2120; PSYC 2301 and 2314; RNSG 1413, 1360, 1431, 1260, 1412, 1261; for Basic Students RNSG 1327, 1251, and 1160 for Transition Students; and AHA/BLS-HCP. Co-requisites: ARTS 1301 or MUSI 1306 or DRAM 1310; RNSG 1441 and 2360.

RNSG 2360 W – Clinical Nursing-Registered Nurse Training (CDM/Mental Health) (3,0,12).

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Prerequisites: BIOL 2301/2101 or 2302/2102, and 2320/2120; PSYC 2301 and 2314; RNSG 1413, 1360, 1431, 1260, 1412, 1261 for Basic Students; RNSG 1327, 1251, and 1160 for Transition Students; and AHA/BLSHCP. Co-requisites: ARTS 1301 or MUSI 1306 or DRAM 1310; RNSG 1441 and 2213.

RNSG 2463 W – Clinical Nursing-Registered Nurse Training (CDM/Management) (4,0,16).

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Prerequisites: BIOL 2301/2101 or 2302/2102, and 2320/2120; PSYC 2301 and 2314; ARTS 1301 or MUSI 1306 or DRAM 1310; RNSG 1413, 1360, 1431, 1260, 1412, 1261, 1441, 2360, and 2213 for Basic Students; RNSG 1327, 1251, 1160, 1441, 2460, 2213 for Transition Students; AHA/BLS-HCP. Co-requisite: RNSG 1443.

RSTO 1221 W – Menu Management (2,1,2).

A study of the food service principles involved in menu planning, layout, and evaluation for a variety of types of facilities and service methods. Emphasis on analysis of menu profitability, modification, commodity use, and other activities generated by the menu.

RSTO 1313 W – Hospitality Supervision (3,3,0).

Fundamentals of recruiting, selection, and training of food service and hospitality personnel. Topics include job descriptions, schedules, work improvement, motivation, applicable personnel laws, and regulations. Emphasis on leadership development.

PSYC 2319 A – Social Psychology (3,3,0).

Theories of individual behavior on the social environment are surveyed. Topics include the socio-psychological process, attitude formation and change, interpersonal relations, and group processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 2301 or SOCI 1301.

RNSG 1160 W – Clinical Nursing-Registered Nurse (Transition) (1,0,3).

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Prerequisites: BIOL 2301/2101, 2302/2102, and 2320/2120; PSYC 2301 and 2314; AHA/BLS-HCP. Co-requisites: RNSG 1251 and 1327.

RNSG 1251 W – Care of the Childbearing Family (2,2,2).

Study of concepts related to the provision of nursing care for childbearing families. Topics may include selected complications. Topics include knowledge, judgment, skills, and professional values within a legal/ethical framework. Prerequisites: BIOL 2401, 2402, 2420 and 1322; PSYC 2301 and 2314; BCIS 1305; RNSG 1201 and AHA/BLS-HCP. Co-requisites: RNSG 1160 and 1327.

RNSG 1260 W – Clinical Nursing-Registered Nurse Training (CDM) (2,0,6).

A health related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Prerequisites: BIOL 2301/2101, 2302/2102 and 2320/2120; PSYC 2301 and 2314; RNSG 1413, 1360; and AHA/BLS-HCP. Co-requisites: ENGL 1301; RNSG 1431, 1412, and 1261.

RNSG 1327 W – Transition to Professional Nursing (3,2,3).

Content include health promotion, expanded assessment, analysis of data, critical thinking skills and systematic problem solving process, pharmacology, interdisciplinary teamwork, communication, and applicable competencies in knowledge, judgment, skills, and professional values within a legal/ethical framework throughout the lifespan. Prerequisites: BIOL 2301/2101, 2302/2102, and 2320/2120; PSYC 2301 and 2314; AHA/BLS-HCP. Co-requisites: RNSG 1251 and 1160.

RSTO 1325 W – Purchasing for Hospitality Operations (3,2,2).

Study of purchasing and inventory management of foods and other supplies to include development of purchase specifications, determination of order quantities, formal and informal price comparisons, proper receiving procedures, storage management, and issue procedures. Emphasis on product cost analysis, yields, pricing formulas, controls, and record keeping at each stage of the purchasing cycle.

RTVB 1321 W – TV Field Production (3,2,3).

Pre-production, production, and post-production process involved in field television production. Topics include field camera setup and operation, field audio, television directing, and in-camera or basic continuity editing with an emphasis on underlying principles of video technology.

SCWK 2301 W – Assessment and Case Management (3,3,0).

Exploration of procedures to identify and evaluate an individual’s and/or family’s strengths, weaknesses, problems, and needs in order to develop an effective plan of action. Topics include oral and written communications essential for assessment, screening, intervention, client information, and referral.

SMER 1331 A – Small Engine Tune Up (3,2,2).

Instruction in tune up procedures for small engines including analysis, valve train, ignition fuel, starter, cutter, and safety compliance systems. Emphasis on the use of appropriate equipment and procedures. Dual credit only

SOCI 1301 A – Introductory Sociology (3,3,0).

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related research methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race/ethnicity, and deviance. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

SOCI 1306 A – Social Problems (3,3,0).

Application of sociological principles and theoretical perspectives to major social problems in contemporary society such as inequality, crime and violence, substance abuse, environmental issues, deviance , or family problems. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 A – or sophomore standing.

SOCI 2301 A – Marriage and Family (3,3,0).

Sociological and theoretical analysis of the structures and functions of the family, the varied cultural patterns of the American family, and the relationships that exist among the individuals within the family, as well as the relationships that exist between the family and other institutions in society. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

SOCI 2326 A – Social Psychology (3,3,0).

Theories of individual behavior in the social environment are surveyed. Topics include the socio-psychological process, attitude formation and change, interpersonal relations, and group processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 2301 or SOCI 1301.

SOCI 2336 A – Criminology (3,3,0).

The course surveys various theories of crime, with an emphasis on understanding the social causes of criminal behavior. The techniques for measuring crime as a social phenomenon and the characteristics of criminals are examined. This course addresses crime types (such as consensual or white-collar crimes), the criminal justice system, and other social responses to crime.

SPAN 1411 A – Beginning Spanish I (4,3,2).

A beginning level course which introduces students to fundamental language skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Study includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Laboratory practice is included in online coursework.

SPAN 1412 A – Beginning Spanish II (4,3,2).

Continuation of Spanish 1411 with emphasis on communication skills. Laboratory practice is included in online coursework. Prerequisite: Spanish 1411, two units of high school Spanish, or an appropriate score on placement test.

SPAN 2311 A – Intermediate Spanish I (3,3,0).

An intermediate level course designed to improve the student’s language skills. Review of language structures, greater emphasis on conversation, vocabulary building, reading, guided composition, and culture. Prerequisite: Spanish 1412, three units of high school Spanish, or an appropriate score on placement test.

SPAN 2312 A – Intermediate Spanish II (3,3,0).

Continuation of Spanish 2311. More advanced study in oral and written expression, with an emphasis on comprehension, appreciation, and interpretation of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Spanish 2311.

SPCH 1315 A – Public Speaking (3,3,0).

A basic course in the study of effective communications through speech. Emphasis is placed upon content, organization, and delivery of speeches for various purposes and occasions. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

SPCH 1318 A – Interpersonal Communication (3,3,0).

Application of communication theory to interpersonal relationship development, maintenance, and termination in relationship contexts including friendships, romantic partners, families, and relationships with co-workers and supervisors. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

SPCH 1321 A – Business and Professional Speaking (3,3,0).

Fundamentals of oral communications; study of special types and techniques of speeches most common to business and professional people; practice in business situations; oral reports; sales talks. Includes panel and committee discussions, and special occasion speeches. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the reading portion of the TSI test.

SPCH 1342 A – Voice and Diction (3,3,0).

A study of the voice mechanism and the International Phonetic Alphabet in order that the student may improve vocal performances and correct careless and ineffective speech habits. Required of speech majors. Cross-listed as COMM 2366.

SPCH 2341 A – Oral Interpretation (3,3,0).

A study of the techniques of effective oral reading. Attention is given to pitch, pronunciation, and articulation. Practical experience in Readers Theatre Productions. Prerequisite: none.

TECA 1311 A – Educating Young Children (3,3,0).

An introduction to the education of the young child, including developmentally appropriate practices and programs, theoretical and historical perspectives, ethical and professional responsibilities, and current issues. Course content must be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards and coincide with the National Association for the Education of Young Children position statement related to developmentally appropriate practices for children from birth through age eight. Requires students to participate in field experiences with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations; and the course includes a minimum of 16 hours of field experiences.

TECA 1318 A – Nutrition, Health, and Safety (3,2,2).

A study of the factors that impact the well-being of the young child including healthy behavior, food, nutrition, fitness, and safety practices. Focuses on local and national standards and legal implications of relevant policies and regulations. Course content must be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards and coincide with the National Association for the Education of Young Children position statement related to developmentally appropriate practices for children from birth to age eight. Requires students to participate in field experiences with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations. Course includes a minimum of 16 hours of field experiences.

TECM 1191 W – Special Topics in Applied Mathematics, General (1,0,4).

Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency.

TECM 1403 W – Technical Calculations (4,3,2).

A review of mathematical functions including fractions, decimals, proportions, perimeters, areas, volumes of geometric figures, and certain algebraic/trigonometric functions, as required by specific businesses and industries for successful on-the-job performance.

VNSG 1219 W – Leadership and Professional Development (2,2,0).

Study of the importance of professional growth. Topics include the role of the licensed vocational nurse in the multi-disciplinary health care team, professional organizations, and continuing education. Prerequisite: American Heart BLS, Computer Introduction for LVN’s through Allied Health Continuing Education, BIOL 2401, BIOL 2402, RNSG 1201, VNSG 1304, VNSG 1330, VNSG 1334, VNSG 1400, VNSG 1402, VNSG 1509, VNSG 1561, VNSG 2662, VNSG 1509, VNSG 2510. Co-requisite: VNSG 2662 or VNSG 2663.

VNSG 1304 W – Foundations of Nursing (3,3,0).

Introduction to the nursing profession including history, standards of practice, legal and ethical issues, and role of the vocational nurse. Topics include mental health, therapeutic communication, cultural and spiritual diversity, nursing process, and holistic awareness. Prerequisite: American Heart BLS, Computer Introduction for LVN’s through Allied Health Continuing Education, BIOL 2301/2101 and BIOL 2302/2102 Co-requisites: VNSG 1400, 1402, and 1561.

VNSG 1330 W – Maternal – Neonatal Nursing (3,3,0).

Study of the biological, psychological, and sociological concepts applicable to basic needs of the family including childbearing and neonatal care. Utilization of the nursing process in the assessment and management of the childbearing family. Topics include physiological changes related to pregnancy, fetal development, and nursing care of the family during labor and delivery and the puerperium. Prerequisite: American Heart BLS, Computer Introduction for LVN’s through Allied Health Continuing Education, BIOL 2301/2101, BIOL 2302/2102, VNSG, 1304, VNSG 1400, VNSG 1402, VNSG 1561. Co-requisites: VNSG 1334 and 2662.

VNSG 1334 W – Pediatrics (3,3,0).

Study of the care of the pediatric patient and family during health and disease. Emphasis on growth and developmental needs utilizing the nursing process. Prerequisite: American Heart BLS, Computer Introduction for LVN’s through Allied Health Continuing Education, BIOL 2301/2101, BIOL 2302/2102, VNSG, 1304, VNSG 1400, VNSG 1402, and VNSG 1561. Co-requisites: VNSG 1330 and VNSG 2662 or VNSG 2663.

VNSG 1400 W – Nursing in Health and Illness I (4,3,3).

Introduction to general principles of growth and development, primary health care needs of the patient across the life span, and therapeutic nursing interventions. Prerequisite: American Heart BLS, Computer Introduction for LVN’s through Allied Health Continuing Education, BIOL 2301/2101, BIOL 2302/2102, and VNSG 1304. Co-requisites: VNSG 1304, 1402, and 1561.

VNSG 1402 W – Applied Nursing Skills I (4,2,6).

Introduction to and application of primary nursing skills. Emphasis on utilization of the nursing process and related scientific principles. Prerequisite: American Heart BLS, Computer Introduction for LVN’s through Allied Health Continuing Education, BIOL 2301/2101 and BIOL 2302/2102. Co-requisites: VNSG 1304,1400, and 1561.

VNSG 1509 W – Nursing in Health and Illness II (5,5,0).

Introduction to common health problems of the adult requiring medical and surgical interventions. Prerequisite: American Heart BLS, Computer Introduction for LVN’s through Allied Health Continuing Education, BIOL 2301/2101, BIOL 2302/2102, VNSG 1304, VNSG 1400, VNSG 1402, and VNSG 1561. Co-requisites: VNSG 2510 and 2663.

VNSG 2510 W – Nursing in Health and Illness III (5,5,0).

Continuation of Nursing in Health and Illness II. Further study of common medical-surgical health problems of the adult including concepts of mental health. Incorporates knowledge necessary to make the transition from student to graduate vocational nurse. Prerequisite: American Heart BLS, Computer Introduction for LVN’s through Allied Health Continuing Education, BIOL 2301/2101, BIOL 2302/2102, VNSG 1304, VNSG 1400, VNSG 1402, VNSG 1561. Co-requisites: VNSG 1509 and 2663.

VNSG 1561 W – Clinical-Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training (5,0,15).

A health related work based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Prerequisite: American Heart BLS, Computer Introduction for LVN’s through Allied Health Continuing Education, BIOL 2301/2101, and BIOL 2302/2102. Co-requisites: VNSG 1400, 1402, and 1561.

VNSG 2662 W – Clinical-Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training (6,0,21).

A health related work based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Prerequisite: American Heart BLS, Computer Introduction for LVN’s through Allied Health Continuing Education, BIOL 2301/2101, BIOL 2302/2102, VNSG, 1304, VNSG 1400, VNSG 1402, VNSG 1561. Co-requisites: VNSG 1330 and 1334.

VNSG 2663 W – Clinical-Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training (6,0,21).

A health related work based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Prerequisite: American Heart BLS, Computer Introduction for LVN’s through Allied Health Continuing Education, BIOL 2301/2101, BIOL 2302/2102, VNSG, 1304, VNSG 1400, VNSG 1402, VNSG 1561. Co-requisites: VNSG 1509 and 1510.

WLDG 1337 W – Introduction to Welding Metallurgy (3,1,6).

A study of ferrous and nonferrous metals from the ore to the finished product. Emphasis on metal alloys, heat treating, hard surfacing, welding techniques, forging, foundry processes, and mechanical properties of metal including hardness, machinability, and ductility.

WLDG 1391 W – Special Topics in Welder/Welding Technologist (3,2,4).

Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency.

WLDG 1413 W – Introduction to Blueprint Reading for Welders (4,1,9).

A study of industrial blueprints. Emphasis placed on terminology, symbols, graphic description, and welding processes. Includes systems of measurement and industry standards. Also includes interpretation of plans and drawings used by industry to facilitate field application and production.

WLDG 1421 W – Welding Fundamentals (4,2,6).

An introduction to the fundamentals of equipment used in oxy-fuel and arc welding, including welding and cutting safety, basic oxy-fuel welding and cutting, basic arc welding processes and basic metallurgy.

WLDG 1435 W – Introduction to Pipe Welding (4,2,4).

An introduction to welding of pipe using the shielded metal arc welding process (SMAW), including electrode selection, equipment setup, and safe shop practices. Emphasis on weld positions 1G and 2G using various electrodes.

WLDG 2553 W – Advanced Pipe Welding (5,2,9).

Advanced topics involving welding of pipe using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Topics include electrode selection, equipment setup, and safe shop practices. Emphasis on weld positions 5G and 6G using various electrodes.